John Sopko, special inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction, testifies on Capitol Hill last June. In a letter released Thursday, Sopko says the U.S. may have been paying for "ghost schools, ghost students and ghost teachers" in Afghanistan. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Charles Dharapak/AP

Fatima Haidari, second from the right, and her bike riding club caught the attention of Humans of Kabul — the Afghanistan version of the popular Humans of New York blog. David Fox/Courtesy of Humans of Kabul hide caption

itoggle caption David Fox/Courtesy of Humans of Kabul

A group of Afghan women are attempting to reach the 24,580-foot summit this summer. In mid-May, two of the climbers, along with two American chaperones, visited Afghanistan's highest mountain to see the terrain firsthand in preparation for the historic climb. Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson/NPR

Lt. Gen. Abdul Raziq is the police chief widely credited with bringing much greater security to the southern Afghan city of Kandahar. But critics accuse him of human rights abuses including torture and extrajudicial killings. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

John Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, testifies on Capitol Hill last June. Sopko says the Afghans are still having trouble managing the money the U.S. sends to the country. The U.S. has spent $110 billion on Afghanistan's reconstruction since 2002. Charles Dharapak/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

itoggle caption Charles Dharapak/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brig. Gen. Akram Samme coordinates his men at Camp Eagle in the Shah Joy district of Zabul province in southern Afghanistan. He is a commander in the major operation against the Taliban that's currently under way. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR