Bagram Attack: Bomber Kills 4 At U.S. Air Base In Afghanistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/501904181/501904182" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Encore: Education 'Shines' On The Schoolgirls Of Kandahar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/501212485/501537376" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pakistan May Deport Afghan Girl From 1985 'National Geographic' Cover

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/501121046/501121047" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Afghan Girl From Famed Photo 3 Decades Ago Is Jailed In Pakistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499554338/499554339" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Migrants arrive to register for relocation at a temporary facility outside The Jungle refugee camp near the port of Calais, France. The camp known for its squalor housed an estimated 6,100 migrants. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Pete Kiehart for NPR

Antonio Guterres, then-U.N. high commissioner for refugees, at a 2015 meeting with Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras in Athens in 2015. Petros Giannakouris/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Petros Giannakouris/AP

Meet The Man Tapped To Become The Next U.N. Secretary-General

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/496724643/496732882" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

'Kingdom' Examines Afghanistan Through The Prism Of The Karzai Family

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495632165/495652116" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Charles Mayer, 30, of San Diego survived an IED attack while serving in Iraq in 2010, but has suffered from complications including PTSD. Stuart Palley for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Stuart Palley for NPR

War Studies Suggest A Concussion Leaves The Brain Vulnerable To PTSD

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495074707/495435919" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama addresses U.S. troops during a surprise visit to Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan in 2014. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Patient Diplomacy And A Reluctance To Act: Obama's Mark On Foreign Policy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494625983/494684788" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New President Will Inherit The War In Afghanistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/493573608/493573609" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Longtime Reporter Recalls Afghanistan Before And After Sept. 11

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/493526789/493526790" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of the Taliban militia ride in vehicles during Afghanistan's annual Independence Day parade in Kabul on Aug. 19, 2001. Afghanistan was largely cut off from the world during the Taliban's rule from 1996 to 2001. That changed dramatically after the Sept. 11 attacks. Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Army soldiers take up a position during a patrol in Baghdad in 2007. The U.S. has been waging war nonstop for 15 years since the Sept. 11 attacks. Despite the protracted conflicts and disappointing results, U.S. involvement in multiple wars appears set to continue for years to come. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Jason Brezler in the market of Nowzad on May 7, 2010, with village elders, Afghan National Police and U.S. Marines. Maj. Brezler is now facing a possible discharge from the Marines after he emailed classified documents. Monique Jaques/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Monique Jaques/Getty Images

A U.S. Marine Tried To Warn A Comrade, Now He Faces A Discharge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/492725042/492775689" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript