Afghan Government Bans Some American Forces For Links To Killings And Torture
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Gen. Stanley McChrystal during a retirement ceremony in 2010. His comments in a Rolling Stone interview helped lead to his resignation. Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images hide caption

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Tina Brown's Must Reads: The Post-Sept. 11 World
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Students in Kabul protest violence against women in Kabul last fall. Afghan President Hamid Karzai issued a decree in 2009 protecting women's rights, but parliament has not passed a law making the decree permanent. Mohammad Ismail/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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The Afghan Battle Over A Law To Protect Women
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As part of homecoming ceremonies at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state in January, Army Spc. Tyler Jeffries — with crutches and prosthetic legs — joins his unit in formation as the national anthem is played. The homecoming marked the first time Jeffries had seen his platoon since he lost both his legs in a roadside bombing in Afghanistan last October. Florangela Davila for NPR hide caption

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A Wounded Soldier Stands Tall At Reunion With His Platoon
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Civilian Casualties In Afghan War Dip For First Time In Six Years
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Jake Tapper's new book, The Outpost, tells the story of one of America's deadliest battles during the war in Afghanistan. Little, Brown & Co. hide caption

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Jake Tapper: 'The Outpost' That Never Should Have Been
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Searching For Ibrahim
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Afghanistan's Fate Unclear As More Troops Expected To Leave
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Obama To Announce Withdrawal Of 34,000 U.S. Troops From Afghanistan
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Looming Cuts Could Mean Big Changes For U.S. Military
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Former Army Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha when he was on duty in Afghanistan. North Dakota National Guard hide caption

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From 'Morning Edition': Jake Tapper talks about Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha
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'Outpost' Tells Battle Story Of Medal Of Honor Nominee
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Afghan police and officials visit the site of a suicide attack in Kabul in September. A suicide bomber blew himself up alongside a minivan carrying foreigners on a major highway leading to the international airport in the Afghan capital, police said, killing at least 10 people, including nine foreigners. Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Afghanistan, Pakistan Seek A Fatwa Against Suicide Attacks
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