A boy on his bike, with a U.S. Stryker following behind, in the Panjwai district center in southern Afghanistan. For years, this area was one of the most dangerous places in Afghanistan. But it is now considered safe as Afghans prepare to vote in a presidential election Saturday. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Bilal Sarwary is an Afghan journalist working in Afghanistan for the BBC. Courtesy of Bilal Sarwary hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Bilal Sarwary

Army Capt. Drew Pham says his wife, Molly Pearl, helps him push through the difficulties of transitioning back to civilian life after deployment in Afghanistan. StoryCorps hide caption

itoggle caption StoryCorps

Afghan Special Forces converge on an Independent Election Commission office after the Taliban launched an assault on the compound Tuesday in Kabul. Two suicide bombers detonated their vests outside the offices while gunmen stormed the building. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Hina Shamsi, director of the ACLU's National Security Project, argues against the motion, "The president has constitutional power to target and kill U.S. citizens abroad." Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

itoggle caption Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Andy Soule, a U.S. Army veteran, lost both his legs to a bomb in Afghanistan in 2005. Four years ago, he won America's first medal — Olympic or Paralympic — in the biathlon event. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Former Marine Josh Sweeney lost both of his legs to a bomb in Afghanistan in 2009. He's competing with the U.S. Men's Sled Hockey team at the Paralympics in Sochi. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR