Afghanistan Afghanistan

Defense Secretary Expresses Concern Over Russian Support For Taliban

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Hossein Mahrammi with his wife and four young sons arrived at at Dulles International Airport in Virginia earlier this month with Special Immigrant Visas for the work Mahrammi had helped the U.S. with in Afghanistan. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Special Immigrant Visa Holders Still Face Questioning Upon Reaching U.S.

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Pakistani security officials gather outside the devastated Marriott Hotel in Islamabad on Sept. 21, 2008, following an overnight suicide bomb attack. The Pentagon announced Satuday that a recent airstrike had killed Qari Yasin, who was linked to the bombing. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images
Marla Aufmuth/TED

Sandi Toksvig: Can Social Change Start With Laughter?

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Former U.S. Army interpreter Qismat Amin arrived in the U.S. from Afghanistan on Feb. 8. Amin waited nearly four years for his Special Immigrant Visa, living in hiding after receiving death threats from the Taliban for helping American troops. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Afghanistan's Ambassador On The Future Of The War

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Two Afghan men weep for their relatives in front of the main gate of a Kabul military hospital Wednesday, after a deadly six-hour attack claimed by the Islamic State. Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images

Then-deputy director of CENTCOM, U.S. Navy Vice Admiral Robert Harward, is pictured with Jordan's Prince Faisal and the Army's head of operations and training Major General Awni Adwan in a May 2012 photo. Harward is now under consideration to replace Michael Flynn as President Trump's national security adviser. Khalil Mazraawi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khalil Mazraawi /AFP/Getty Images

An American soldier scanned the retina of a man in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan in Dec. 2011. Russia cites the danger of ISIS in Nangarhar as its reason for backing the Taliban, the U.S. says. Sgt. Trey Harvey/U.S. Army hide caption

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Sgt. Trey Harvey/U.S. Army

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl at Fort Bragg, N.C. His defense team is arguing that he cannot get a fair trial after Donald Trump repeatedly called Bergdahl a traitor in public. Ted Richardson/AP hide caption

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Ted Richardson/AP

General Requests Thousands More Troops To Break Afghanistan 'Stalemate'

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Soldiers from the 36th Infantry Division deployed to Afghanistan to help train and advise that country's military. The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan says thousands more such troops are needed there. Maj. Randall Stillinger/U.S. Army hide caption

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Maj. Randall Stillinger/U.S. Army

The International Committee of Red Cross emblem hangs on the wall of a hospital in Afghanistan's Herat province. Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images