Briefings are part of the demobilization process that the 182nd Infantry Regiment must go through at Camp Atterbury in Columbus, Ind. Tom Dreisbach/NPR hide caption

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Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War

A Rest Stop On The Road From Soldier To Civilian

The returning 182nd Infantry Regiment learns there's more than a plane ride between them and home.

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During the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, a video showing the al-Qaida leader watching television was discovered. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Afghan miners in a makeshift emerald mine in the Panjshir Valley in 2010. Reports suggest that Afghanistan is sitting on significant deposits of oil, gas, copper, iron, gold and coal, as well as a range of precious gems like emeralds and rubies. Currently these minerals are largely untapped and are still being mapped. Majid Saeedi/Getty Images hide caption

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Members of the 182nd Infantry Regiment arrive in Indiana after spending a year in Afghanistan. They will spend about a week here before returning to their homes in New England. Tom Dreisbach/NPR hide caption

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In this 2005 photo, then-Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney presents Afghan President Hamid Karzai with a memento at Boston's Logan Airport. Karzai was preparing to speak at Boston University's commencement. Dina Rudick /AP hide caption

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This August 23, 2011 photograph obtained courtesy of the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System (DVIDS) shows Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (right) at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. (Note at 10:50 p.m. ET: Earlier, we mistakenly said he was on the left.) Spc. Ryan Hallock /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales during an August 2011 training exercise at Fort Irwin, Calif. Spc. Ryan Hallock/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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From video of the incident, as the helicopter swooped low over a snowy base in Afghanistan moments before crashing in the distance. YouTube.com hide caption

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Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, who is accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians, will have the case heard in the military justice system, which has significant differences from the civilian courts. Here, Bales is shown in a training exercise in Fort Irwin, Calif., last August. Spc. Ryan Hallock/AP hide caption

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Afghan villagers prayed last week at a ceremony for the 16 victims of what officials say was an attack by a U.S. Army soldier. Allauddin Khan/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way

Soldier Doesn't Remember Much, Lawyer Says

Muhammad Wazir says 11 of his family members, including his wife and six children, died in the massacre of 16 civilians that's been blamed on a U.S. Army soldier.

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