Capt. Mike Miller, with Delta Company, 2nd Brigade Combat Team of the 101st Airborne Division, rides in his Humvee during a training mission at Fort Polk, La. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Army Preps For Next Afghan Target: Kandahar

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On Pakistan's Border, Progress And Challenges

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Gulbuddin Hekmatyar (shown here in Iran in 2001), leader of the militant Hizb-i-Islami group, has recently made peace overtures to Afghan President Hamid Karzai. But observers are unsure about his motives. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Afghan Militant Leader's Motives Under Scrutiny

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Obama's Afghan Trip Comes Amid Rising War Support

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Marine Sgt. Maj. Robert Breeden, at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan on June 12, 2009. Breeden is now home from Afghanistan and trying to stay busy. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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A Marine Home From War And Battling Boredom

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Obama Presses Karzai To Root Out Corruption

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Pakistan's Militia Mixes New Tactics, Ancient Rules

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President Obama walks with Afghan President Hamid Karzai during a welcoming ceremony at the Presidential Palace on Sunday night in Kabul. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Obama Makes Surprise Visit To Afghanistan

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Hockey's Stanley Cup Travels To Afghanistan

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Afghanistan's President: Partner Or Obstacle?

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Afghan Detainees Make An Uneasy Journey Home

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Karzai Holds Talks With Rebel Group

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Oops, Taliban Arrests Derail Secret U.N. Talks

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Police officers from the district of Argu swing away with long sticks to eradicate a patch of illegally grown poppies in the Badakhshan province of Afghanistan. The opium trade is a key source of funding for the Taliban — but counterterrorism experts say it will take more than shutting down opium production to crack the Taliban's finances. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Exploring The Taliban's Complex, Shadowy Finances

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