A volunteer brings daily food rations for people who fled the conflict in the Kasai region earlier this month. They are at a camp for internally displaced persons in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of Congo. John Wessels /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels /AFP/Getty Images

NPR's Eyder Peralta Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

I Spent 4 Days In Jail In South Sudan. I Won't Stop Reporting On The Crisis There

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Coffee is thought to have originated in Ethiopia. Coffea arabica, or coffee Arabica, the species that produces most of the world's coffee, is indigenous to the country. Courtesy of Alan Schaller hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Schaller

Linda Fortune's family was forced out of District Six when she was 22. Growing up, the family often ate crayfish her father caught as a hobby. "If you had an overabundance of fish, you would share it with the neighbors," she recalls. Alan Greenblatt/NPR hide caption

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Alan Greenblatt/NPR

Economic Collapse And Government Paranoia In South Sudan

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Workers spread "red vanilla" (vanilla that has been treated by special cooking) in the sun to be dried near Sambava, Madagascar, in May 2016. Madagascar, producer of 80 percent of the world's vanilla, has seen huge jumps in the price. It's one of the most labor-intensive foods on Earth. Rijasolo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rijasolo/AFP/Getty Images

Our Love Of 'All Natural' Is Causing A Vanilla Shortage

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NPR Reporter Recounts Detention In South Sudan

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A woman grieves for her daughter, who was shot by militants during an attack on a restaurant in Mogadishu, Somalia. Early Thursday, Somali security forces ended a nightlong siege by al-Shabab extremists at the popular Pizza House restaurant in the country's capital. Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP hide caption

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Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP

A Quarter Of South Sudan's Population On The Run From Brutal Civil War

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Kenya Announces Ban On Plastic Bags

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A scene from Lies That Bind, one of Kenya's most successful homegrown soap operas. Its creator was inspired by the Mexican telenovelas she watched as a kid. Courtesy of Lies That Bind hide caption

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Courtesy of Lies That Bind

Why East Africa Is Hooked On Telenovelas

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Price Of Corn, A Kenyan Staple, Soars

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Mariatu Kamara is a former prostitute who was trained to become a motorbike taxi driver. Despite police harassment and restrictions on where taxis can operate, she is determined to make her new life work. Olivia Acland for NPR hide caption

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Olivia Acland for NPR