State Department Cuts Could Affect Famine Relief In South Sudan

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Emirates passenger planes are parked at their gates at Dubai International Airport in the United Arab Emirates. The U.S. restrictions require most electronic devices, including laptops, tablets and cameras, to be placed in checked baggage on direct flights to the U.S. from eight mostly Muslim countries, including the UAE. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Kamran Jebreili/AP

U.S., Britain Restrict Electronics On Flights From Mideast Countries

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An African giant pouched rat sniffs for traces of land mine explosives at a training facility run by APOPO, a nonprofit that trains the rats to detect both tuberculosis and land mines. Not only does it have an excellent nose, but it can jump 5 feet in the air. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Military Works With African Security Forces To Fight Boko Haram

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A gay man with HIV stands in a clinic in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He's been afraid to pick up his medicine because of the government's crackdown on the gay community. Kevin Sief/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Women carry food in gunny bags after visiting an aid distribution center in South Sudan on March 10. Albert Gonzalez Farran /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Albert Gonzalez Farran /AFP/Getty Images

Why The Famine In South Sudan Keeps Getting Worse

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Exercises With U.S. Military Help Chadian Forces Fight Extremism

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Police officers secure the perimeter at the scene of a garbage landslide, as excavators aid rescue efforts on the outskirts of Ethiopia's capital city, Addis Ababa, on Sunday. Elias Meseret/AP hide caption

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Acutely malnourished child Sacdiyo Mohamed, 9 months old, is treated at Banadir hospital in Somalia on Saturday. Somalia's government has declared the drought there a national disaster. Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP hide caption

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Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP

A child holds an umbrella as refugees at a refugee camp in Palorinya, Uganda. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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14-Year-Old Who Fled South Sudan: 'They're Killing Women, Children'

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Chris Bertish enters the English Harbour at Antigua on Thursday, a flare trailing behind him in celebration. He paddled more than 4,050 nautical miles to reach this point. Courtesy Brian Overfelt for The SUP Crossing hide caption

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Courtesy Brian Overfelt for The SUP Crossing

Judith Ausah (left) and Evelyn Sewodey create solar panels at the Lady Volta Vocational Center for Electricity and Solar Power in Ghana. "At first, I thought it was man's work," says Ausah, whose 2-month-old daughter stays in the school nursery. "But I came here and saw that, yes, women can do it." Ginanne Brownell/For NPR hide caption

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Ginanne Brownell/For NPR

Somali Students Help Teachers Learn What It's Like To Be A Refugee

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A 5-year-old child cries as a nurse struggles to find a vein for an injection at a health clinic last month in Shada, Somalia. The child's family lost all their animals to drought and traveled more than 100 miles in search of a better situation. Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Farmer Georges Kouamé Koffi holding two cocoa pods. Chocolate is made from the almond-sized cocoa beans contained in the pods. Alex Duval Smith for NPR hide caption

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A Dip In Global Prices Creates Cocoa Crisis For Ivory Coast's Farmers

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South Sudan's Civil War Sparks Africa's Largest Refugee Crisis

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