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Can Poetry Keep You Young? Science Is Still Out, But The Heart Says Yes

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The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine recommends that most adults get about 600 international units of vitamin D per day through food or supplements, increasing that dose to 800 IUs per day for those 70 or older. essgee51/Flickr hide caption

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essgee51/Flickr

A Bit More Vitamin D Might Help Prevent Colds And Flu

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Physical therapy may not help a person with a progressive chronic disease become well, but it can help slow a decline. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Medicaid doesn't just provide health care for the poor; it also pays for long-term care for a lot of older people, including the majority of nursing home residents. Repealing the ACA could change the way Medicaid programs are funded. Bill Gallery/Doctor Stock/Science Faction/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Gallery/Doctor Stock/Science Faction/Getty Images

Obamacare Repeal Could Threaten Provisions That Help Older Adults

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Annette Schiller of Palm Desert, Calif., who was 94 and diagnosed with terminal thyroid and breast cancer, had trouble finding doctors to help her end her life under California's new aid-in-dying law. Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald hide caption

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Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald

The back of your throat relaxes when you sleep, and that can cause the airway to vibrate — in a thundering snore. Getty Images hide caption

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Do Anti-Snoring Gadgets Really Work?

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Without Any Family, Aging Adults Rely On Friends For Help

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Emil Girardi, 83, and Shipra Narruhn, 67, chat in Girardi's San Francisco apartment. They were paired through a nonprofit called Little Brothers, Friends of the Elderly, which aims to relieve isolation and loneliness. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Easing Old People's Loneliness Can Help Keep Them Healthy

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Diseased brain tissue from an Alzheimer's patient showing amyloid plaques (in blue) located in the gray matter of the brain. Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images

Adox and Michaeli with their son, Orion, in the winter of 2015. Courtesy of Christine Gatti hide caption

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Courtesy of Christine Gatti

A Dying Man's Wish To Donate His Organs Gets Complicated

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John Evard, 70, at the Las Vegas Recovery Center last July. Evard, a retired tax attorney, checked into a rehabilitation program to help him quit the prescribed opioids that had left him depressed, groggy and dependent on the drugs. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Opioids Can Derail The Lives Of Older People, Too

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Elderly hospitalized patients taken care of by female doctors had better results than those seen by male doctors. Julie Delton/Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Delton/Getty Images

Patients Cared For By Female Doctors Fare Better Than Those Treated By Men

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Bobo gives her mother a kiss. Her mother can't talk or move her arms or legs. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Caring For A Loved One At Home Can Have A Steep Learning Curve

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Life Expectancy In U.S. Drops For First Time In Decades, Report Finds

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A Brighter Outlook Could Translate To A Longer Life

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