Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (left) hugs Annette Bebout, 73, of Newton, during a campaign event at Berg Middle School, in Newton, Iowa, this week. Bebout told her story to the audience of how she lost her home. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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The routines that students learn at Dance for PD classes in Venice, Calif., can be quite challenging, instructors say. Courtesy of Joe Lambie and Laura Karlin hide caption

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Lower-back pain is one of the top three reasons that Americans go to the doctor. But the solution can be a DIY project. iStockphoto hide caption

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An MRI scan shows Bryan Arling's brain from above. The white-looking fluid is a subdural hematoma, or a collection of blood, that pushed part of his brain away from the skull, causing headaches and slowing his decision-making. Courtesy of Dr. Ingrid Ott, Washington Radiology Associates hide caption

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Van Zyl and Garcia Flores hold hands as van Zyl promises to do everything she can to ease his pain and control symptoms. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health New/Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jeffrey Iliff (left), a brain scientist at Oregon Health & Science University, has been studying toxin removal in the brains of mice. He'll work with Bill Rooney, director of the university's Advanced Imaging Research Center, to enroll people in a similar study in 2016. Courtesy of Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Lipitor (atorvastain calcium) tablets made by Pfizer. PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

What To Think About Conflicting Medical Guidelines

Recommendations for who should get mammograms or take cholesterol-lowering drugs are among the medical guidelines that have recently changed.

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Belle Likover, a 96-year-old retired social worker, told Case Western Reserve medical students that growing old gracefully is all about being able to adapt to one's changing life situation, including health challenges. Lynn Ischay/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Delma and Antonio Salazar have been caring for Delma's mother, Agnes Williams (middle), who has severe memory problems, for the past seven years. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Age takes a toll on our internal clocks. Universal Stopping Point Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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A hearing test you take on your phone provides immediate, private feedback. George Doyle/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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When Mary asked Helen what she wants for Christmas, Helen said: "All I ask is to be in good spirits and in good health so I can come and show myself off when we have the party." Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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A recent analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that Medicare recipients taking Revlimid for cancer could end up paying, on average, $11,538 out of pocket for the drug in 2016, even if the medicine is covered by their Medicare Part D plan. Carmine Galasso/MCT/Landov hide caption

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More than three hours a day could mean brain fade by middle age. Raoul Minsart/Masterfile/Corbis hide caption

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