Nenosuke Yamamoto, 80, stands in the shed where he repairs bicycles in Tokyo. "I feel that if I keep on working, I might not age as much," he says. "I might not have dementia or other sorts of aging issues." Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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For Some Older Adults In Japan, A Chance To Stay In The Workforce

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Hiroyuko Yamamoto, a crossing guard in Matsudo, Japan, has been trained in how to recognize and gently approach people who are wandering, or have other signs of dementia, in ways that won't frighten them. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Japanese City Takes Community Approach To Dealing With Dementia

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This Lawson convenience store in Kowaguchi, Japan, sells a selection of prepared meals and fresh vegetables and meats, along with products aimed at the elderly. Many of the store's older customers find it hard to get to the supermarket, the store's manager says. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Beyond Slurpees: Many Japanese Mini-Marts Now Cater To Elders

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Kristin Armstrong won Olympic gold in the cycling time trial the day before she turned 43. Tim de Waele/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Olympic Athletes Prove That Older Doesn't Have To Mean Slower

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Express Scripts assures patients it has a policy of not putting cancer medicine or mental health drugs on the list of products it excludes from its formulary. Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

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Will Your Prescription Meds Be Covered Next Year? Better Check!

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Nurse specialist Annelie Nilsson checks on patient Janet Prochazka during her stay at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, after Prochazka took a bad fall in March. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Hospital Units Tailored To Older Patients Can Help Prevent Decline

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An inspection found that at one Los Angeles nursing home an employee took video of a co-worker "passing gas" on the face of a resident and posted it on Instagram. Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

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Josephine Rudolph, 99, says she couldn't afford to live at the Joyce Eisenberg Keefer Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility in Reseda, Calif., without Medi-Cal assistance. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

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Indiana Gov. Mike Pence took questions from the media as he and his wife, Karen, left their New York hotel to meet with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on July 15. Pence has drawn criticism from the left and the right for various health care stances. Andres Kudacki/AP hide caption

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The physical therapy workouts a rehabilitation facility offers can be a crucial part of healing, doctors say. But a government study finds preventable harm — including bedsores and medication errors — occurring in some of those facilities, too. Andersen Ross/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Exercise physiologist Courtney Conners checks Mario Oikonomides' vital signs before his cardiac rehab workout at the University of Virginia Health System clinic. Francis Ying/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Cardiac Rehab Saves Lives. So Why Don't More Heart Patients Sign Up?

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In states that made medical marijuana legal, prescriptions for a range of drugs covered by Medicare dropped. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Mullens, age 93, in her room at Edgewood Summit Retirement Community in Charleston, W.Va. Mullens is a patient of Dr. Todd Goldberg, one of only 36 geriatricians in the state. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Few Young Doctors Are Training To Care For U.S. Elderly

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William Kitt has lived in a studio apartment in New York owned by the nonprofit Broadway Housing Communities for 13 years, after decades of living on the streets. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Invisibilia: For An Artist, A Room Of His Own Is A Lifesaver

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The backlog of appeals of denied Medicare claims will take years to clear up even after changes proposed by the Department of Health and Human Services. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Virginia Anderlini (right) was the first private client to try out Dr. Sonya Kim's new virtual reality program for the elderly, and says she's eager to see more. Kim's handful of programs are still at the demo stage. Kara Platoni/KQED hide caption

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An independent commission recommended changes to Medicare Part D, including reducing or waiving copayments for generic drugs for low-income enrollees. Shana Novak/Getty Images hide caption

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