There will be about 55 percent more people with diabetes as baby boomers become senior citizens, a report finds. Rolf Bruderer/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Miss Susie Susannah Mushatt Jones with her niece Lois Judge as they celebrate her 113th birthday with a party at the Vendalia Senior Center in Brooklyn in 2012. New York Daily News/NY Daily News via Getty Images hide caption

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The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has spent about $117 million on Medicare Advantage audits that have recouped just $14 million related to overcharging. Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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What's Good For The Heart Is Good For The Brain
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A Baby Boomer With Parkinson's Reports Back From Front Lines Of Aging
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Talking about end-of-life care may be difficult, but the stakes make the conversations worth the effort. Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

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A woman jogs in Oakland, Calif., last February. Healthier lifestyles may be a reason why poor people live longer in some cities than others. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Life Expectancy Study: It's Not Just What You Make, It's Where You Live
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Stanford Challenges Young Designers To Help Older Adults
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Steve Julian, a radio host with KPCC in Los Angeles, was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer last November. He and his wife, Felicia Friesema, turned to social media for solace, support and the space to process their heartbreaking journey. Rachael Myrow/KQED hide caption

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Industrial Science Hunts For Nursing Home Fraud In New Mexico Case
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