NPR logo

Hear 'Black Water' By Timber Timbre

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133744527/133744637" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Song Premiere: 'Black Water' By Timber Timbre

Song Premiere: 'Black Water' By Timber Timbre

Hear 'Black Water' By Timber Timbre

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133744527/133744637" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Over four albums in six years, Timber Timbre has consistently kicked up a lovelorn winter wind with a subtle sway and a smoky wink. The musical foundation here isn't groundbreaking – blues and folk, early rock and roll, Son House and Neil Young prove the Canadian trio's touchstones. But for all those rote tributaries, they've cut a haunted, gnarled switch of plaintive toe-tap entirely theirs.

Timber Timbre's Taylor Kirk. Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the Artist

For the group's newest full-length, Creep On Creepin' On, due out April 5, Timber Timbre's singer-songwriter Taylor Kirk has brought along a new friend for the spotlight: soul, in its rawest form – think Sam Cooke at his most frustrated. The restrained density of Timber Timbre's recordings, alternating barebones atmosphere with lush swells and harpsichord strums, is easy to overlook when Kirk sings in that golden-era croon. It could be a whisper if it wasn't so full, like Roy Orbison rolling out of bed. On "Black Water" the band lay down Timber Timbre's rootsy thesis more beautifully than ever, happily gazing at the stars from a dark gutter. And after a winter of mass discontent, we can all relate.

NPR thanks our sponsors