NPR logo
All Songs +1: Why We Like The Music We Like
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401925095/401926581" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
All Songs +1: Why We Like The Music We Like

Our Show

All Songs +1: Why We Like The Music We Like

All Songs +1: Why We Like The Music We Like
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401925095/401926581" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Guests hold up ratings cards at an All Songs Considered listening party in Boston. i

Guests hold up ratings cards at an All Songs Considered listening party in Boston. Kelly Davidson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Kelly Davidson for NPR
Guests hold up ratings cards at an All Songs Considered listening party in Boston.

Guests hold up ratings cards at an All Songs Considered listening party in Boston.

Kelly Davidson for NPR

What goes on in your brain when you hear a new song? Is there a formula for what makes a perfect pop song? What's better, something brand new, or something familiar? It's nearly impossible to completely explain or understand why we like the music we like. But Susan Rogers, a music cognition expert and associate professor of music production and engineering at the Berklee College of Music, gets closer to making sense of it than we've heard before.

Earlier this week, we held a listening party in Boston where Rogers was on a panel of guests who shared and talked about a mix of new and old songs in front of an audience of Berklee students and All Songs listeners. In the latest edition of our Plus One mini podcast, we're going to share a moment from that listening party when Rogers shared some of her ideas about how our brains react to certain kinds of music. It's short, and it's not connected to any particular song, but I bet you'll think about it the next time you hear a new song for the first time.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.