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Tuesday Night Dispatch From SXSW 2016
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SXSW 2016 Late-Night Dispatches: Tuesday

SXSW Music Festival

SXSW 2016 Late-Night Dispatches: Tuesday

Tuesday Night Dispatch From SXSW 2016
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Lucky Chops, a brass band from New York, plays at Empire Control Room. i

Lucky Chops, a brass band from New York, plays at Empire Control Room. Bob Boilen/NPR hide caption

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Lucky Chops, a brass band from New York, plays at Empire Control Room.

Lucky Chops, a brass band from New York, plays at Empire Control Room.

Bob Boilen/NPR

SXSW, like a perennial that blooms tacos and hot sauce, is here once again. Each day this week, we'll report back with a podcast, photos, a recap of our favorite sets of the day and a special intimate performance we call the South X Lullaby (don't miss Lucius' from two nights ago).

Last night, Bob Boilen, Katie Presley and Stephen Thompson — NPR Music's first troops on the ground — stood in the streets of Austin to discuss their favorite moments of SXSW Music's unofficial first day, including a band called Thelma and the Sleaze and artists who wear fox fur when it's 92 degrees outside (yet still close their set with a James Brown cover).


Day 1 Highlights

Golden Dawn Arkestra at Maggie Mae's Rooftop

Every time I stepped closer to the stage, the more hypnotic the spectacle became: I counted 18 members of this band specializing in Sun Ra-style space-jams, and every one was decked out in something to draw the eye, from massive headgear to spangly gowns. The music felt ripe for dancing, or for getting lost in. —Stephen Thompson

Lucky Chops at Empire Control Room

Did you ever see someone and just feel compelled to go talk to them? I was seeing Miya Folick at an outdoor venue. It's 92 degrees and a man with cotton candy blue and pink hair is sitting on a bench wearing a fur stole. So, we struck up a conversation (yes, it was real fox) and he tells me he plays sax in a band called Lucky Chops from N.Y.C. So I went and saw this totally on fire, big ass brass band. They are so full of life, with such a fresh take on brass — gnarly, punky and funky. They closed out their set with James Brown's "I Feel Good" and 500 or so people, including me, sure did! — Bob Boilen

Photos From SXSW Day 1

  • Diet Cig

    Alex Luciano strikes a pose during the band's set at the Hype Hotel on Tuesday at SXSW 2016. i

    Alex Luciano strikes a pose during the band's set at the Hype Hotel on Tuesday at SXSW 2016. Adam Kissick for NPR hide caption

    toggle caption Adam Kissick for NPR
    Alex Luciano strikes a pose during the band's set at the Hype Hotel on Tuesday at SXSW 2016.

    Alex Luciano strikes a pose during the band's set at the Hype Hotel on Tuesday at SXSW 2016.

    Adam Kissick for NPR
  • Sheer Mag

    Christina Halladay owned the stage at Hotel Vegas in East Austin. i

    Christina Halladay owned the stage at Hotel Vegas in East Austin. Adam Kissick for NPR hide caption

    toggle caption Adam Kissick for NPR
    Christina Halladay owned the stage at Hotel Vegas in East Austin.

    Christina Halladay owned the stage at Hotel Vegas in East Austin.

    Adam Kissick for NPR
  • US Weekly

    Christopher Nordahl shed his shirt during a humid day at Hotel Vegas. i

    Christopher Nordahl shed his shirt during a humid day at Hotel Vegas. Adam Kissick for NPR hide caption

    toggle caption Adam Kissick for NPR
    Christopher Nordahl shed his shirt during a humid day at Hotel Vegas.

    Christopher Nordahl shed his shirt during a humid day at Hotel Vegas.

    Adam Kissick for NPR

South X Lullaby: Holly Macve

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