Facebook claims to have 1.23 billion daily users globally. Mark Zuckerberg recently announced that he wants that number to grow and for users to conduct their digital lives only on his platform. bombuscreative/iStock hide caption

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Facebook Wants Great Power, But What About Responsibility?

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Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L) is building 1,000 charging stations and helping to turn a Midwestern metropolitan area into one of the fastest-growing electric vehicle markets in the country. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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In America's Heartland, A Power Company Leads Charge For Electric Cars

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A woman holds up her cellphone before a rally with then presidential candidate Donald Trump in Bedford, N.H., in September. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Is Donald Trump Helping Or Hurting Twitter?

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An employee walks along a path at the Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. Synergy Park campus in Hyderabad, India, in 2016. Some in-house PG&E employees will be replaced by workers from TCS. Namas Bhojani/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Namas Bhojani/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Using H-1B Visas To Help Outsource IT Work Draws Criticism, Scrutiny

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General Motors has high hopes for the Chevrolet Bolt EV (shown here during its debut at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit last year). It can travel 238 miles on one charge. Currently, the only other all-electric cars with that kind of range are Teslas, which are far more expensive. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Rollout Of Chevy Bolt May Mark Turning Point For Electric Car Market

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Pilot models of self-driving cars for Uber are displayed in Pittsburgh. Autonomous vehicles are expected to cut traffic jams, but not before enough human drivers are off the road. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Self-Driving Cars Could Ease Our Commutes, But That'll Take A While

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Cryptoparties Teach Attendees How To Stay Anonymous Online

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President Trump gives a thumbs up as he speaks on the phone in the Oval Office on Jan. 29. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Is Trump Tweeting From a 'Secure' Smartphone? The White House Won't Say

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A sign near the entrance of the Facebook campus in Menlo Park, Calif. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Searching For 'Facebook Customer Service' Can Lead To A Scam

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If we care about protecting our personal information and feel uncomfortable giving it away, why do we keep doing it? John Hersey for WNYC hide caption

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John Hersey for WNYC

Privacy Paradox: What You Can Do About Your Data Right Now

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