Newly hired Spokane County Sheriff's Deputy Russell Aldrich chats with strangers in a shopping mall. The exercise is meant to help rookies build up the subtle people skills that older police trainers claim are lacking among many millennial recruits. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

In Social Media Age, Young Cops Get Trained For Real-Life Conversation

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A Syrian woman and her child sit in their refugee living space in Lebanon. They are featured in Four Walls, a virtual reality presentation by the International Rescue Committee. YouVisit Studios hide caption

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YouVisit Studios

Can Virtual Reality Make You More Empathetic?

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Josuhe Pagliery grew up playing video games on consoles he says were not common in Cuba. Those games helped inspire him to develop Savior, Cuba's first independent video game. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Amid Isolation, 2 Cubans Develop Island's First Video Game

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Amazon's personal assistant device Echo, powered by the voice recognition program Alexa, is one of the most popular gifts this holiday season. Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images

As We Leave More Digital Tracks, Amazon Echo Factors In Murder Investigation

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UCSF is laying off some of its IT staff and sending their jobs to a contractor with headquarters in India. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Outsourced: In A Twist, Some San Francisco IT Jobs Are Moving To India

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As more people turn to laser displays for holiday house decorations, aviation authorities warn not to shine them into the sky. TeleBrands hide caption

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TeleBrands

For Christmas Thrills Without The Spills, More Decorators Turn To Lasers

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Generation after generation has sat in the lap of this Santa Claus. This year baby Michael Sykes IV got a portrait with New Orleans' Seventh Ward Santa. Courtesy of Taya Thomas and Michael Sykes III hide caption

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Courtesy of Taya Thomas and Michael Sykes III
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Why Aren't There More Women In Tech? A Tour Of Silicon Valley's Leaky Pipeline

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Privacy groups have filed a complaint about My Friend Cayla dolls to the Federal Trade Commission, arguing that they spy on children. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Brian Naylor/NPR

This Doll May Be Recording What Children Say, Privacy Groups Charge

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A team at the University of Toronto Computer Science Department, has been teaching a computer to write sing-along music. They're calling it "neural karaoke." Atomic Imagery/Getty Images hide caption

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Atomic Imagery/Getty Images

Warning: This Christmas Carol May Haunt Your Dreams

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Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How One Couple Fought For The Legal Right To Leave A Bad Yelp Review

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President-elect Donald Trump speaks with technology leaders at Trump Tower in New York. Albin Lohr-Jones/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Albin Lohr-Jones/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Trump And Technology Executives Try To Reconcile Rough Relationship

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks July 16 in New York City. The president-elect's Twitter habit could run up against cybersecurity recommendations once he's in office — but he may also choose to disregard that advice to keep his direct channel to the public open. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Thomas/Getty Images

What Will Trump's Twitter Strategy Be When He Becomes President?

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Michael Czaplinski has been unveiling the magic of computers for more than a quarter century. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

'Never Trust Magic': Tips From An IT Guy

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Researchers at Cornell University have developed a soft robotic hand with a touch delicate enough to sort tomatoes and find the ripest one. Huichan Zhao/Organic Robotics Lab, Cornell University hide caption

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Huichan Zhao/Organic Robotics Lab, Cornell University