When a person places a finger in the slot on the left, the robot uses an algorithm — unpredictable even to its creator — to decide whether to prick the finger with the pin on the end of its arm. Alexander Reben hide caption

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A Robot That Harms: When Machines Make Life Or Death Decisions

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Listen: 'Web Site Story,' NPR's Musical About The Internet — From 1999

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An exhibitor shows a smart rice cooker to a visitor at a display booth for MiJia, a new brand by Xiaomi at the 2016 Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing on April 28. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Losing Steam In Smartphones, Chinese Firm Turns To Smart Rice Cookers

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A screenshot from the video game Fallout 3 of a character standing near a Nuka-Cola machine. Soda machines appear in video games a lot more frequently than Jess Morrissette expected, so he decided to document this phenomenon. @decafjedi/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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A customer tries the Siri voice recognition function on an Apple iPhone 6 Plus in Hong Kong. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Voice Recognition Software Finally Beats Humans At Typing, Study Finds

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Nextdoor CEO Nirav Tolia says a pilot project using algorithms to check for racially charged terms has helped cut racial profiling posts by roughly 50 percent. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Social Network Nextdoor Moves To Block Racial Profiling Online

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Juno CEO Talmon Marco talks with driver Fara Louis Jeune. The company recruited drivers by looking at Uber cars with the highest ratings. Juno hide caption

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Uber Competitor In NYC Promises Drivers Benefits, Even Employee Status

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At Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia, Calif., riders of the New Revolution Virtual Reality Coaster wear VR goggles to play a video game while the roller coaster twists and turns. Courtesy of Six Flags hide caption

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On Six Flags' Virtual Reality Coaster, The Ride Is Just Half The Thrill

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Polling station chairman helps a voter at a voting machine during the Republican presidential primary in February in West Columbia, S.C. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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After DNC Hack, Cybersecurity Experts Worry About Old Machines, Vote Tampering

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Old Macs are displayed in glass cases in the back of Tekserve, a repair shop with a cult following that's closing this week. Jon Kalish hide caption

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Saying Goodbye To Old Technology — And A Legendary NYC Repair Shop

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Words classified according to their gender, as the word embedding sees it. Words below the line are words that (generally) should be gendered, while words above the line are problematic if gendered. Adam Kalai hide caption

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Passengers wait at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport after a computer systems failure on Monday caused Delta to delay or cancel hundreds of flights. Branden Camp/AP hide caption

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Why The Airline Industry Could Keep Suffering System Failures Like Delta's

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Verizon's Metamorphosis: Can You See Me As A Tech Giant Now?

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Taylor Swift is one of many artists urging Congress to update copyright laws, which they argue don't fairly pay for music available online. Kevin Mazur/WireImage/Getty hide caption

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Why Taylor Swift Is Asking Congress To Update Copyright Laws

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Bug enthusiast Anna Lindqvist uploads photos like this — of the Ailanthus Webworm Moth (Atteva aurea) to the iNaturalist app. Like a social network for wildlife, her location paired with the photo help both amateur and expert naturalists identify the species. Annika Lindqvist hide caption

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The App That Aims To Gamify Biology Has Amateurs Discovering New Species

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Liam Norris/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

At This English Bar, An Old-School Solution To Rude Cellphones

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Yahoo President and CEO Marissa Mayer delivers a keynote during the Yahoo Mobile Developers Conference on Feb. 18, in San Francisco. Stephen Lam/Getty Images hide caption

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Is There A Double Standard When Female CEOs In Tech Stumble?

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The UNL NIMBUS Lab drone team hopes their technology will help ensure safer prescribed burns by keeping firefighters out of dangerous terrain. Ariana Brocious/NET News hide caption

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Drones That Launch Flaming Balls Are Being Tested To Help Fight Wildfires

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People play Pokémon Go in New York City on July 25. The New York governor's ban on playing the game will apply to nearly 3,000 sex offenders currently on parole. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

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Sophisticated ways of tracking reading habits give publishers hard data that reveals the kinds of books people want to read. But a veteran editor says numbers only go so far in telling the story. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Publishers' Dilemma: Judge A Book By Its Data Or Trust The Editor's Gut?

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Silicon Valley engineer Bindu Reddy created the new social network Candid that facilitates online conversations without trolls. Courtesy of Bindu Reddy hide caption

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Can Candid Conversations Happen Online Without The Trolls?

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