Binky is a new social media app where users can scroll, share and like random posts, but all the actions are meaningless. iTunes hide caption

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iTunes

Meet Binky, The Social Media App Where Nothing Matters

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For two years, Hawkins let his app guide him around the globe, including a stop in Gortina, Slovenia. Courtesy of Max Hawkins hide caption

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Courtesy of Max Hawkins

Eager To Burst His Own Bubble, A Techie Made Apps To Randomize His Life

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The Gab.ai home page cites the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR

Feeling Sidelined By Mainstream Social Media, Far-Right Users Jump To Gab

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Andrew Knight holds a sign of Pepe the frog, an alt-right icon, during a rally in Berkeley, Calif., on April 27. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

What Pepe The Frog's Death Can Teach Us About The Internet

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"DoggoLingo" is a language trend that's been gaining steam on the Internet in the past few years. Words like doggo, pupper and blep most often accompany a picture or video of a dog and have spread on social media. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

A conference worker passes a demo booth at Facebook's annual F8 developer conference, on Tuesday in San Jose, Calif. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Murder Video Again Raises Questions About How Facebook Handles Content

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NPR reporter Aarti Shahani tested Facebook's new social VR platform. She requested an older avatar to represent her, but that was not available. Her guide "Phil" had her tour virtual cherry blossoms. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Facebook's New Grand Plan To Draw You In

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Henry Tsai (front) and Yasyf Mohamedali created Hi From The Other Side, a website that connects people with opposing political views online and then gets them to meet in real life. Asma Khalid/WBUR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/WBUR

Tech Creates Our Political Echo Chambers. It Might Also Be A Solution

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It is time for us to assess the pros and cons of the tweetstorm, the thread, the whatever and figure out just what it all means. diego_cervo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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diego_cervo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Tim Berners-Lee still largely sees the potential of the Web, but it has not turned out to be the complete cyber Utopian dream he had hoped. Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images

These days, talking to a bot is commonplace. Think Siri, or your chatty banking app. But you wouldn't talk to your toaster like you talk to a friend — unless your toaster had a great sense of humor. RYGERSZEM/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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RYGERSZEM/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Facebook claims to have 1.23 billion daily users globally. Mark Zuckerberg recently announced that he wants that number to grow and for users to conduct their digital lives only on his platform. bombuscreative/iStock hide caption

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bombuscreative/iStock

Facebook Wants Great Power, But What About Responsibility?

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A woman holds up her cellphone before a rally with then presidential candidate Donald Trump in Bedford, N.H., in September. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Is Donald Trump Helping Or Hurting Twitter?

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A sign near the entrance of the Facebook campus in Menlo Park, Calif. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Searching For 'Facebook Customer Service' Can Lead To A Scam

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Multiple Twitter accounts claiming to be run by members of the National Park Service and other U.S. agencies have appeared since the Trump administration's apparent gag order. The account owners are choosing to remain anonymous. David Calvert/Getty Images hide caption

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David Calvert/Getty Images

Merriam-Webster's Twitter account weighs in on trending words and phrases and has waded into linguistic matters in politics, including a big campaign question: Did Donald Trump say "bigly" or "big league"? Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR