A woman holds up her cellphone before a rally with then presidential candidate Donald Trump in Bedford, N.H., in September. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Is Donald Trump Helping Or Hurting Twitter?

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A sign near the entrance of the Facebook campus in Menlo Park, Calif. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Searching For 'Facebook Customer Service' Can Lead To A Scam

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Multiple Twitter accounts claiming to be run by members of the National Park Service and other U.S. agencies have appeared since the Trump administration's apparent gag order. The account owners are choosing to remain anonymous. David Calvert/Getty Images hide caption

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Merriam-Webster's Twitter account weighs in on trending words and phrases and has waded into linguistic matters in politics, including a big campaign question: Did Donald Trump say "bigly" or "big league"? Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR

Newly hired Spokane County Sheriff's Deputy Russell Aldrich chats with strangers in a shopping mall. The exercise is meant to help rookies build up the subtle people skills that older police trainers claim are lacking among many millennial recruits. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

In Social Media Age, Young Cops Get Trained For Real-Life Conversation

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks July 16 in New York City. The president-elect's Twitter habit could run up against cybersecurity recommendations once he's in office — but he may also choose to disregard that advice to keep his direct channel to the public open. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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What Will Trump's Twitter Strategy Be When He Becomes President?

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How does Facebook decide when to take down controversial images and posts? Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

From Hate Speech To Fake News: The Content Crisis Facing Mark Zuckerberg

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is defending the company against criticism that it doesn't vet fake news in its news feed. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Facebook, Google Take Steps To Confront Fake News

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Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are introduced during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., on Sept. 26. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

An App Saw Trump Winning Swing States When Polls Didn't

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Renditions of the Mannequin Challenge have been done by professional sports teams, high school students, and even a few celebrities including Destiny's Child. It looks like they decided to do another reunion that didn't require a Super Bowl performance. @kellyrowland/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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@kellyrowland/Screenshot by NPR