SXSW Pressured After Pulling Sessions On Gaming Culture

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A person plays Candy Crush Saga on his tablet in Lille, northern France. This year, mobile games revenues are expected to fly past console games and hit more than $30 billion worldwide. Philippe Hugen /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Apple TV, App Makers Try To Move Casual Gamers To Bigger Screen

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An attendee plays video games at the Gamescom 2015 gaming trade fair on August 5, 2015 in Cologne, Germany. Sascha Schuermann/Getty Images hide caption

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Talking About Women's Issues In Gaming Still Taboo, Developer Says

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Tyler Hines (from left), Jaden Bautista, Eric Apfelbaum, and Justin Bautista play Minecraft together for the Super League Gaming event at Regal Cinemas on Monday in New York City. The players were able to build their own creations in Minecraft and battle each other while connected to the large movie theater screen. Adam Wolffbrandt/NPR hide caption

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Video game designer Shigeru Miyamoto introduces Nintendo's Super Mario Maker at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles in 2014. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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The Legendary Mr. Miyamoto, Father Of Mario And Donkey Kong

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Shigeru Miyamoto plays the latest Mario game, called Super Mario Maker, at the Nintendo booth Wednesday at this year's E3 video game expo in Los Angeles. Travis Larchuk/NPR hide caption

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An attendee at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles plays Sony's Project Morpheus London Heist video game with a virtual reality headset and Move controllers. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gaming Industry Pushes Virtual Reality, But Content Lags

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Ellen McLain (center) meets with fans of GlaDOS, the popular character from the Portal and Portal 2 video games which she voices. Courtesy of John Patrick Lowrie and Ellen McLain hide caption

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The Unlikely Stars Of Americans' Favorite Video Games

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Zynga CEO Mark Pincus gives a presentation in 2011. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Once The Cream Of The Crop, Zynga Zigzags To Adapt To Mobile

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MindMaze Software Engineer Nicolas Bourdaud demonstrates a virtual reality system at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco on Tuesday. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Developers Continue Push To Make Virtual Reality Mainstream

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Cameo Stevens, 35, plays Mike Tyson's Punch-Out! at Save Point Video Games in Charlotte, N.C. The market for old video games of the '80s and '90s has seen a surge in recent years. Ben Bradford/WFAE hide caption

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Businesses Offer A Link To The Past For Lovers Of Old Video Games

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Allison Begalman, a student at the University of Southern California, wears goggles and headphones to experience a virtual mortar strike on civilians in Aleppo, Syria. James Delahoussaye/NPR hide caption

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Virtual Games Try To Generate Real Empathy For Faraway Conflict

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A screen shot from Seven Quests shows a battle with the hero, Rostam, and his troops. The game is based on a 1,000-year-old Iranian poem. Courtesy of Gameguise hide caption

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Video Game Based On Ancient Story Aims For Audiences In Iran, Beyond

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Dealer Omar Abu-Eid adjusts a stack of chips before the first day of the World Series of Poker's main event in Las Vegas last July. Humans still reign in most versions of poker. Whew. John Locher/AP hide caption

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Look Out, This Poker-Playing Computer Is Unbeatable

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German-American game developer Ralph Baer shows the prototype of the first games console which was invented by him during a press conference on the Games Convention Online in Leipzig, Germany in 2009. Baer died on Saturday. He was 92. Jens Wolf /DPA /Landov hide caption

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This is Desert Bus. This is it --€” plus the occasional bus stop. Desert Bus hide caption

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Terrible Video Game, Great Fundraiser: Meet Desert Bus For Hope

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Chip maker Intel recently pulled an advertising campaign from a gaming site amid pressures from supporters of the online #Gamergate movement. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Under the #Gamergate hashtag, a debate has flared surrounding ethics in video game journalism and the role and treatment of women in the video game industry. iStockphoto hide caption

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#Gamergate Controversy Fuels Debate On Women And Video Games

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