There are countless communication options, including Yahoo's new Livetext app. Livetext allows users to send a message accompanied by live video but no audio. James Boast/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption James Boast/Getty Images/Ikon Images

An aerial view of Monticello shows Mulberry Row to the right of Thomas Jefferson's house. Robert Llewellyn/© Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello hide caption

toggle caption Robert Llewellyn/© Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello

Screen shot of a Yik Yak exchange where one person expresses thoughts about possibly hurting him/herself, and others respond. Samantha Braver hide caption

toggle caption Samantha Braver

On College Campuses, Suicide Intervention Via Anonymous App

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/422620195/422739316" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Susan Prescott, Apple vice president of product management and marketing, demonstrates the News app during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco on Monday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As varied as the options are for apps that are available to help you navigate your daily commute, the future of GPS may be more accurate. Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Corbis

The Tech Behind Traffic Apps: How (Well) Do They Work?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/407658702/407749373" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Comedian Aziz Ansari became a pioneer of emoji language use in 2011, when he transcribed the hit Jay-Z and Kanye West song, "Ni**as In Paris." azizisbored.tumblr.com hide caption

toggle caption azizisbored.tumblr.com

As Emojis Spread Beyond Texts, Many Remain [Confounded Face] [Interrobang]

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/404209790/404236547" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Peerby allows people to share their stuff through a mobile app for free. Peerby hide caption

toggle caption Peerby

Why Buy When You Can Borrow? App Connects People And Stuff

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/374184584/374511155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Apple Pay is demonstrated at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

toggle caption Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Will Apple's Mobile Wallet Replace Your Leather Wallet?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/357508522/357508896" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After a tornado leveled Moore, Okla., last year, firefighter Shonn Neidel (left) developed an app that helps first responders locate storm shelters under the wreckage. Courtesy of Shonn Neidel hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Shonn Neidel

Storm Shelter App Helps Pinpoint People Amid Tornado's Rubble

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/314235543/314607059" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Matchmaking apps like Tinder can help people find potential dates quickly. Tinder hide caption

toggle caption Tinder

Mobile Match Apps Are 'Dating On Steroids'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/276617790/276782591" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sandra Hassan put her app online in late January as yet more explosions struck Lebanon. She hopes it will help people in conflict zones, and areas hit by natural disasters. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption STR/AFP/Getty Images

Beirut Bombing Spawns An App To Tell Loved Ones 'I Am Alive'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/269657817/269935049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Several Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are developing services that manage consumers' investment portfolios with algorithms rather than people. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Can Robots Manage Your Money Better Than You? Startups Say Yes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/257551881/258301883" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A screenshot of the iPad game If, which aims to teach kids how to navigate interpersonal challenges and failures. NPR hide caption

toggle caption NPR

Video Game Creators Are Using Apps To Teach Empathy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/246395383/246410533" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alex Blaszczuk used Google Glass to shoot this self portait. Courtesy of Alex Blaszczuk hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Alex Blaszczuk

Accessible Designs Could Help Us All — But Only If Firms Bite

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/225791332/225855286" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Craig Federighi, senior vice president of software engineering at Apple, discusses features of the new iOS 7 during the keynote address of the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference on June 10 in San Francisco. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption Eric Risberg/AP

Beyond The Shadows: Apple's iOS 7 Is All About The Screen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/218533735/218559719" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Tile, accompanied by an iPhone app, locates items that are attached to it. It's about as small as a matchbook or a stamp. Matt Perko/Courtesy of Tile hide caption

toggle caption Matt Perko/Courtesy of Tile

Drinks columnist David Wondrich is seen on Esquire's new Talk to Esquire app, which allows users to interact with several of the magazine's columnists through voice recognition. Screengrab via YouTube hide caption

toggle caption Screengrab via YouTube

Speak Up! Advertisers Want You To Talk With New Apps

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/177345718/177371308" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript