Beth Cobert says cybersecurity has been boosted since she took over as acting director of the Office of Personnel Management last summer. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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One Year After OPM Data Breach, What Has The Government Learned?

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Facebook's Moments app uses facial recognition technology to group photos based on the friends who are in them. Amid privacy concerns in Europe and Canada, the versions launched in those regions excluded the facial recognition feature. Facebook hide caption

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Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

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Yahoo Chief Information Security Officer Bob Lord on encryption: "Yes, it's used by terrorists. It's also used by people who are looking to voice their opinions on issues and to save lives." Yahoo hide caption

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FBI Director James Comey testifies March 1 before the House Judiciary Committee on the encryption of the iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino attackers. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FBI Executive Assistant Director for Science and Technology Amy Hess (from left) testifies on encryption Tuesday before a House panel, alongside the New York City Police Department's Thomas Galati and Indiana State Police Office Capt. Charles Cohen. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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The official FBI seal is seen on an iPhone camera screen outside the agency's headquarters. With help from a third party, the FBI managed to unlock the iPhone used by one of San Bernardino shooters. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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The Next Apple-FBI Question: Who Can Know How The iPhone Was Hacked?

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Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., have introduced encryption legislation. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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The Next Encryption Battleground: Congress

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The anonymous Web surfing system Tor is run by volunteers — and sometimes they get caught between the police and criminal suspects. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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When A Dark Web Volunteer Gets Raided By The Police

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Brittney Mills (center) stands with her mother, Barbara (left), and a family friend at her baby shower days before Brittney was killed. Aarti Shahani/NPR; Original photo courtesy of Barbara Mills hide caption

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Mom Asks: Who Will Unlock Murdered Daughter's iPhone?

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A protester supporting Apple in its battle against the FBI holds up an iPhone that reads "No Entry" outside an Apple store in New York on Feb. 23. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Apple Vs. The FBI: The Unanswered Questions And Unsettled Issues

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A customer tries out a new iPhone at an Apple store in Chicago. The FBI is working with a "third party" to test a method of seeing what's inside the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters without Apple's help. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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The 227-year-old law at the center of the Apple-FBI debate has withstood several challenges, including at the Supreme Court. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Gambling Case Does, And Doesn't, Apply To The iPhone Debate

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Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler has proposed what could become the first privacy regulations for Internet service providers. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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FCC Chair: Proposal Would Let Consumers Determine Value Of Internet Privacy

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The iconic clock tower and library at University of California, Berkeley. The University of California system, especially Berkeley, has a stormy history around free speech and spying by the federal government. John Morgan/Flickr hide caption

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At Calif. Campuses, A Test For Free Speech, Privacy And Cybersecurity

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FBI Director James Comey told a congressional hearing on March 1, that encryption was creating "warrantproof" devices. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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How A Foiled Robbery Sheds Light On Apple's Clash With The FBI

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A visitor takes photos with her smartphone outside the Supreme Court in 2014, while the judges heard arguments related to warrantless cellphone searches by police. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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