If we care about protecting our personal information and feel uncomfortable giving it away, why do we keep doing it? John Hersey for WNYC hide caption

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John Hersey for WNYC

Privacy Paradox: What You Can Do About Your Data Right Now

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Amazon's personal assistant device Echo, powered by the voice recognition program Alexa, is one of the most popular gifts this holiday season. Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images

As We Leave More Digital Tracks, Amazon Echo Factors In Murder Investigation

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Privacy groups have filed a complaint about My Friend Cayla dolls to the Federal Trade Commission, arguing that they spy on children. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Brian Naylor/NPR

This Doll May Be Recording What Children Say, Privacy Groups Charge

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The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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Journalist Andrew McGill wanted to see if it was possible to hack a virtual toaster, after major servers were downed by connected appliances. He said it took less than an hour for hackers to find it. ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic hide caption

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ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic

An Experiment Shows How Quickly The Internet Of Things Can Be Hacked

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A New York Police Department security camera set up along a street in New York City on Aug. 26. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Alexander/Getty Images

It Ain't Me, Babe: Researchers Find Flaws In Police Facial Recognition Technology

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Despite cybersecurity and hacks being a constant issue during the campaign, neither Donald Trump, nor Hillary Clinton professes to have expertise in this policy area. Mark Ralston/AP hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AP

Cyber Aggression Takes A Back Seat To Other Presidential Campaign Issues

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New technology helps trackers follow consumers' digital imprints — including across devices — through browser settings, battery levels and other details. Mark Airs/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Mark Airs/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Online Trackers Follow Our Digital Shadow By 'Fingerprinting' Browsers, Devices

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Data brokers collect information on how you use the Internet, from personal data you share on Facebook to online shopping. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Firms Are Buying, Sharing Your Online Info. What Can You Do About It?

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Beth Cobert says cybersecurity has been boosted since she took over as acting director of the Office of Personnel Management last summer. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

One Year After OPM Data Breach, What Has The Government Learned?

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Facebook's Moments app uses facial recognition technology to group photos based on the friends who are in them. Amid privacy concerns in Europe and Canada, the versions launched in those regions excluded the facial recognition feature. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook

Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

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Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College

Yahoo Chief Information Security Officer Bob Lord on encryption: "Yes, it's used by terrorists. It's also used by people who are looking to voice their opinions on issues and to save lives." Yahoo hide caption

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Yahoo

FBI Director James Comey testifies March 1 before the House Judiciary Committee on the encryption of the iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino attackers. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FBI Executive Assistant Director for Science and Technology Amy Hess (from left) testifies on encryption Tuesday before a House panel, alongside the New York City Police Department's Thomas Galati and Indiana State Police Office Capt. Charles Cohen. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP