All Tech Considered

All Tech ConsideredAll Tech Considered

Tech, Culture and Connection

After recent terrorist attacks, social media companies are under pressure to do more to stop messaging from terrorist groups. Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Charlize, 8, plays with the Kidizoom Multimedia Digital Camera made by VTech in 2009. A recent data breach hacking sensitive information, including kid's photos, is prompting parents to look twice at their children's technology usage. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Oli Scarff/Getty Images

Many federal inmates have access to email but defense attorneys say they don't trust it, because prosecutors have used those emails as evidence in court. Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images

CIA Director John Brennan made this case against encryption on Monday at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Win McNamee/Getty Images

Luma is a new Wi-Fi manager that turns a parent's smartphone into an Internet remote control. Luma hide caption

toggle caption Luma

You can find your audio commands by visiting your Google voice and audio activity history page. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ariel Zambelich/NPR

President Obama, seen at a cybersecurity summit in Palo Alto, Calif., in February. The White House has called the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act an "important building block." Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov

Mark Patterson, owner of PATCO Construction in Sanford, Maine, boosted his security and bought cybercrime insurance after his company lost more than $500,000 to cyberfraud. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

toggle caption John Ydstie/NPR

California Gov. Jerry Brown signs one of the hundreds of bills on Friday, among them a new law that is contains the most stringent digital privacy protections in the country. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption Rich Pedroncelli/AP

"We don't collect a lot of your data and understand every detail about your life. That's just not the business that we are in," says Apple CEO Tim Cook, shown here at the NPR offices in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Mark Patterson, owner of PATCO Construction in Sanford, Maine, said his company lost more than $500,000 to cyberfraud. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

toggle caption John Ydstie/NPR

Platte River Networks managed Hillary Clinton's private computer server. A spokesman for the Colorado-based technology services company said the firm "has no knowledge of the server being wiped." Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

toggle caption Brennan Linsley/AP

Casey Corcoran and his wife, Margie Skeer, were on a romantic getaway when they discovered he was listed in the Ashley Madison leaked data. Courtesy of Casey Corcoran hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Casey Corcoran

When you answer your phone and there's no one on the other end, it could be a computer that's gathering information about you and your bank account. Jonathan Kitchen/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Jonathan Kitchen/Getty Images

Farmer Dave Alford can't fix his own tractors like this one because it's run by software with proprietary digital locks. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Laura Sydell/NPR

Eugene Kaspersky, founder and chief executive officer of Kaspersky Lab, at his office in Moscow last Dec. 9. Kaspersky and his firm have ties to the Russian government, but say that should not be cause for concern in the West, where the company's cybersecurity software is widely used. Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr./Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr./Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hackers say they took control of a Tesla Model S through the car's computers. Tesla Motors says it is updating its systems with a patch to fix the vulnerability. Tesla Motors hide caption

toggle caption Tesla Motors

Both Google and Samsung are rolling out new processes to issue security updates for Android devices, like the Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images