In this photo dated Aug. 23, 2010, Iranian technicians work at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, where Iran had confirmed several personal laptops infected by Stuxnet malware. Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency hide caption

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Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency

A screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack on a laptop in Beijing. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

From Kill Switch To Bitcoin, 'WannaCry' Showing Signs Of Amateur Flaws

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Microsoft President Brad Smith speaks at the annual Microsoft shareholders meeting on Nov. 30, 2016, in Bellevue, Wash. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Microsoft President Urges Nuclear-Like Limits On Cyberweapons

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A driver uses a phone while behind the wheel of a car on April 30, 2016, in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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'Textalyzer' Aims To Curb Distracted Driving, But What About Privacy?

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Former FBI agent Clint Watts testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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How Russian Twitter Bots Pumped Out Fake News During The 2016 Election

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Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

Companies And Users Can Do More To Stay Secure With Smart Devices

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The Washington Post and other media organizations have launched webpages outlining ways you can leak information to them confidentially. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How The Media Are Using Encryption Tools To Collect Anonymous Tips

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Cryptoparties Teach Attendees How To Stay Anonymous Online

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President Trump gives a thumbs up as he speaks on the phone in the Oval Office on Jan. 29. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Is Trump Tweeting From a 'Secure' Smartphone? The White House Won't Say

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If we care about protecting our personal information and feel uncomfortable giving it away, why do we keep doing it? John Hersey for WNYC hide caption

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John Hersey for WNYC

Privacy Paradox: What You Can Do About Your Data Right Now

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Amazon's personal assistant device Echo, powered by the voice recognition program Alexa, is one of the most popular gifts this holiday season. Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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As We Leave More Digital Tracks, Amazon Echo Factors In Murder Investigation

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Privacy groups have filed a complaint about My Friend Cayla dolls to the Federal Trade Commission, arguing that they spy on children. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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This Doll May Be Recording What Children Say, Privacy Groups Charge

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The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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Journalist Andrew McGill wanted to see if it was possible to hack a virtual toaster, after major servers were downed by connected appliances. He said it took less than an hour for hackers to find it. ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic hide caption

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ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic

An Experiment Shows How Quickly The Internet Of Things Can Be Hacked

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A New York Police Department security camera set up along a street in New York City on Aug. 26. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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It Ain't Me, Babe: Researchers Find Flaws In Police Facial Recognition Technology

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Despite cybersecurity and hacks being a constant issue during the campaign, neither Donald Trump, nor Hillary Clinton professes to have expertise in this policy area. Mark Ralston/AP hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AP

Cyber Aggression Takes A Back Seat To Other Presidential Campaign Issues

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New technology helps trackers follow consumers' digital imprints — including across devices — through browser settings, battery levels and other details. Mark Airs/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Mark Airs/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Online Trackers Follow Our Digital Shadow By 'Fingerprinting' Browsers, Devices

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