All Tech Considered

All Tech ConsideredAll Tech Considered

Tech, Culture and Connection

Heath Miller of the Pittsburgh Steelers catches the ball on the 1-yard line against defender Brandon Flowers of the San Diego Chargers during Monday's game in San Diego. Donald Miralle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Donald Miralle/Getty Images

A helicopter flies near the Lake Fire in California's San Bernardino National Forest on June 19. Firefighters mobilized to combat the wildfire from the air, but they had to be grounded to avoid drones in the area. David McNew/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption David McNew/Reuters/Landov

The Commerce Department is looking to place tighter controls on exporting software that can attack a network. The cybersecurity industry opposes the proposed new rules. Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images

New federal rules could expand the number of employees eligible for overtime. That may lead more companies to curtail the use of work email after hours. Skopein/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption Skopein/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Google is doing test flights of its balloons carrying Internet routers around the world. Last June, a balloon was released at the airport in Teresina, Brazil. Google hide caption

toggle caption Google

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler unveiled his plan in a Wired op-ed on Wednesday. The FCC is scheduled to vote on the proposal Feb. 26. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Randall Stephenson, chairman and CEO of AT&T, introduces President Obama before the latter's remarks Dec. 3 at the quarterly meeting of the Business Roundtable, a group Stephenson chairs. Stephenson has said that increasing regulation of the broadband industry — as proposed by the president — would have a substantial chilling effect on its investment in infrastructure. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Pool/Getty Images

Even when the weather turns nasty, some students are expected to log on to their classes from home. Magictorch/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Magictorch/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Leah Bannon (sitting) works on her laptop at 18F, a GSA project that aims to make government websites more user friendly and change the way government buys IT systems. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Jan/NPR

A Philadelphia police officer demonstrates a body-worn camera being used as part of a pilot project last December. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption Matt Rourke/AP

President Obama called on the Federal Communications Commission to implement a strict policy of net neutrality and to oppose content providers in restricting bandwidth to customers. Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images

Consumers can window shop on leading up to open enrollment, which starts Saturday. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP

Megan Smith is the new U.S. chief technology officer. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ariel Zambelich/NPR


From Silicon Valley To White House, New U.S. Tech Chief Makes Change

Former Google X executive Megan Smith started this month as the U.S. chief technology officer. She's only the third person to have the job.

Listen Loading… 4:50
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    <iframe src="" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Nearly 20 companies have filed antitrust complaints against Google in Europe since 2009. Francois Lenoir/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Francois Lenoir/Reuters/Landov

The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters. Greg E. Mathieson Sr./Mai/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Greg E. Mathieson Sr./Mai/Landov

Nuala O'Connor, president and CEO of the Center for Democracy and Technology, testifies on net neutrality issues before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Win McNamee/Getty Images

Slow-loading messages will appear on some of your favorite sites Wednesday as part of a protest for net neutrality. But the sites won't actually be loading slower — the banners will be displayed just to make a point. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto