Eighth graders Cristian Munoz (left) and Clifton Steward work on their Chromebooks during a language arts class at French Middle School in Topeka, Kan. Both students were eligible to bring the devices home this summer. Scott Ritter/Courtesy of French Middle School hide caption

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Scott Ritter/Courtesy of French Middle School

Online sales are growing by about 15 percent each year, but states say they're not getting their fair share of taxes from e-commerce. razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Massachusetts Tries Something New To Claim Taxes From Online Sales

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In this photo dated Aug. 23, 2010, Iranian technicians work at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, where Iran had confirmed several personal laptops infected by Stuxnet malware. Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency hide caption

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Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has started the process to roll back Obama-era regulations for Internet service providers. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

FCC Chief Makes Case For Tackling Net Neutrality Violations 'After The Fact'

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Paulo Melo is a global entrepreneur-in-residence at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. This visa workaround allowed Melo, originally from Portugal, to legally stay in the United States and build his business in Massachusetts. Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR

Without A Special Visa, Foreign Startup Founders Turn To A Workaround

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Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

The New Orleans Police Department was one of the first big police departments in the U.S. to embrace the use of body cameras. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gardner/Getty Images

New Orleans' Police Use Of Body Cameras Brings Benefits And New Burdens

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U.S. lawmakers are once again weighing changes to the popular but troubled H-1B work visa. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Trump May Weigh In On H-1B Visas, But Major Reform Depends On Congress

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Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How One Couple Fought For The Legal Right To Leave A Bad Yelp Review

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President-elect Donald Trump speaks with technology leaders at Trump Tower in New York. Albin Lohr-Jones/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Albin Lohr-Jones/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Trump And Technology Executives Try To Reconcile Rough Relationship

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Product safety field staff send damaged products, such as this burnt battery pack from a defective electric scooter, to the government testing lab in Rockville, Md. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

As Batteries Keep Catching Fire, U.S. Safety Agency Prepares For Change

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As the presence of artificial intelligence continues to grow in the world, industry leaders and scholars are starting to explore the ethics surrounding the science. Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images

Scholars Delve Deeper Into The Ethics Of Artificial Intelligence

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Aaron Levie, CEO of Box, supported Hillary Clinton and he says he will continue to work and lobby for what he believes. Lisa Lake/Getty Images hide caption

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Tech Leaders Vow To Resist Trump, But They Also Hope To Find Common Ground

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Workers at the Department of Homeland Security's National Operations Center in 2015. The Obama administration proposes $3.1 billion in upgrades to federal computer systems. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Steven Vachani is in a protracted legal battle with Facebook. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

The Man Who Stood Up To Facebook

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This emergency alert jolted New Yorkers on Sept. 19 as police sought a suspect in connection with explosions in the New York City metropolitan area. Lacking a photo or a link to one, it raised concerns about racial profiling. AP hide caption

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AP

Self-driving Uber vehicles are lined up to take journalists on rides during a media preview at the company's Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh earlier this month. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Regulating Self-Driving Cars For Safety Even Before They're Built

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Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler says lack of competition in set-top boxes has meant consumers pay more to get TV services. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

People play Pokémon Go in New York City on July 25. The New York governor's ban on playing the game will apply to nearly 3,000 sex offenders currently on parole. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

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Can Big Data Help Head Off Police Misconduct?

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