Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How One Couple Fought For The Legal Right To Leave A Bad Yelp Review

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505852927/506076767" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President-elect Donald Trump speaks with technology leaders at Trump Tower in New York. Albin Lohr-Jones/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Albin Lohr-Jones/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Trump And Technology Executives Try To Reconcile Rough Relationship

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505604737/505612111" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Product safety field staff send damaged products, such as this burnt battery pack from a defective electric scooter, to the government testing lab in Rockville, Md. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

As Batteries Keep Catching Fire, U.S. Safety Agency Prepares For Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/503132072/503632472" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the presence of artificial intelligence continues to grow in the world, industry leaders and scholars are starting to explore the ethics surrounding the science. Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images

Scholars Delve Deeper Into The Ethics Of Artificial Intelligence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502905772/502918119" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Aaron Levie, CEO of Box, supported Hillary Clinton and he says he will continue to work and lobby for what he believes. Lisa Lake/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lisa Lake/Getty Images

Tech Leaders Vow To Resist Trump, But They Also Hope To Find Common Ground

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502019360/502051049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers at the Department of Homeland Security's National Operations Center in 2015. The Obama administration proposes $3.1 billion in upgrades to federal computer systems. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Steven Vachani is in a protracted legal battle with Facebook. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Aarti Shahani/NPR

The Man Who Stood Up To Facebook

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/497820170/497850355" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This emergency alert jolted New Yorkers on Sept. 19 as police sought a suspect in connection with explosions in the New York City metropolitan area. Lacking a photo or a link to one, it raised concerns about racial profiling. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Self-driving Uber vehicles are lined up to take journalists on rides during a media preview at the company's Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh earlier this month. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gene J. Puskar/AP

Regulating Self-Driving Cars For Safety Even Before They're Built

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494765472/494765475" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler says lack of competition in set-top boxes has meant consumers pay more to get TV services. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

People play Pokémon Go in New York City on July 25. The New York governor's ban on playing the game will apply to nearly 3,000 sex offenders currently on parole. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Can Big Data Help Head Off Police Misconduct?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486499835/486507617" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pump-Bol is a ThermoLife workout supplement containing arginine. Cameron Robert/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cameron Robert/NPR

Bodybuilders Beef Over A Workout Supplement — And A Stanford Patent

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483438151/485281409" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lending Club founder and then-CEO Renaud Laplanche is interviewed on TV after his company's initial public offering on the New York Stock Exchange in December 2014 in New York. Laplanche resigned in May 2016. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

With Lending Club Disgraced, An Industry Looks For Lessons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481474919/481501856" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A bill in New York would allow police to examine drivers' phones to see whether they were using the device at the time of an accident. Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images/Image Source

New York Wants To Know: Have You Been Texting And Driving?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474980140/475848926" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A hammock-canoe drawing, U.S. Patent No. 299,951, is displayed in a June 1884 publication of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Va. Critics of the patent system say it's too easy for people to save a slew of semi-realistic ideas, then sue when a firm separately tries to make something similar. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg via Getty Images