Students at Do Space learn to use a laser cutter during a crash course on how to design a key chain. Joy Carey/NET News hide caption

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In Omaha, A Library With No Books Brings Technology To All

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Peter Thiel, head of Clarium Capital Management and founding investor in PayPal and Facebook, speaks at a conference in San Francisco on April 12. Noah Berger/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Two people hold electronic devices while looking over a sculpture by George Segal with the Living Wall in the background at the newly expanded San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Too Much Technology Can Spoil Your Warhol Experience

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Joe Milam explains his investor-relations company, AngelSpan, to fourth-grader Anna Allemann (white shirt, left) and third-grader Sage Powell during Pitch-a-Kid in Austin, Texas, on April 30. Brenda Salinas for NPR hide caption

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For Entrepreneurs, Pitching To Pint-Sized Sharks Is No Child's Play

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About 14 percent of the Gigafactory in Nevada has been built so far. At 5.8 million square feet, it will be a building with one of the biggest footprints in the world. Tesla hide caption

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A Rare Look Inside The 'Gigafactory' Tesla Hopes Will Revolutionize Energy Use

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Gina Rodriguez as Jane and Brett Dier as Michael in the popular TV series Jane the Virgin, in which a shared online calendar was a plot point. Tyler Golden/© 2016 The CW Network, LLC. hide caption

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Justin Worst, Marlo Webber and Jes Waldrip show off an LED light implant. Grindhouse Wetware calls it the Northstar. Courtesy of Ryan O'Shea hide caption

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'Body Hacking' Movement Rises Ahead Of Moral Answers

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Information Overload And The Tricky Art Of Single-Tasking

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About one-quarter of lower-income families with school-age children say a mobile device is their only way to access the Internet at home, according to a new study. iStockphoto hide caption

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How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

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Get A Grip On Your Information Overload With 'Infomagical'

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The Yik Yak app allows users to post anonymous messages, and to read anonymous messages posted in their current location. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Yik Yak Tests Universities' Defense Of Free Speech

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Andy Raymond demonstrates the Armatix iP1, a .22-caliber smart gun that has a safety interlock, at Engage Armaments in Rockville, Md., last year. Katherine Frey/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Will Obama's Action Create A Market For 'Smart' Guns?

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Mobile Internet "hot spot" devices are now the most popular item at the Spring Hill Library in Tennessee. Courtesy of the Spring Hill Library hide caption

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For Internet To Go, Check The Library

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Art imitates life in this 2015 addition to London's Madame Tussauds: a wax figure of Kim Kardashian, taking a selfie — naturally. Tabatha Fireman/Getty Images hide caption

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Selfies In 2015: A Woman Thing?

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While the days of sharing mixed tapes and audio cassettes may be long gone, exchanging playlists doesn't have to be. Darren Johnson/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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