Students at Do Space learn to use a laser cutter during a crash course on how to design a key chain. Joy Carey/NET News hide caption

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In Omaha, A Library With No Books Brings Technology To All

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Scientists in California are turning to big data to help save the red-legged frog, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Gary Kittleson hide caption

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Using Algorithms To Catch The Sounds Of Endangered Frogs

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SignAloud gloves translate sign language into text and speech. Conrado Tapado/Univ of Washington, CoMotion hide caption

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These Gloves Offer A Modern Twist On Sign Language

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Joe Milam explains his investor-relations company, AngelSpan, to fourth-grader Anna Allemann (white shirt, left) and third-grader Sage Powell during Pitch-a-Kid in Austin, Texas, on April 30. Brenda Salinas for NPR hide caption

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For Entrepreneurs, Pitching To Pint-Sized Sharks Is No Child's Play

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Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

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This 2005 silicon wafer with Pentium 4 processors was signed by Gordon Moore for the 40th anniversary of Moore’'s law. Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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About 14 percent of the Gigafactory in Nevada has been built so far. At 5.8 million square feet, it will be a building with one of the biggest footprints in the world. Tesla hide caption

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A Rare Look Inside The 'Gigafactory' Tesla Hopes Will Revolutionize Energy Use

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about the company's 10-year road map during his keynote address Tuesday at the F8 Facebook Developer Conference in San Francisco. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Facebook's New Master Plan: Kill Other Apps

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A hammock-canoe drawing, U.S. Patent No. 299,951, is displayed in a June 1884 publication of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Va. Critics of the patent system say it's too easy for people to save a slew of semi-realistic ideas, then sue when a firm separately tries to make something similar. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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A box of 3-D models 24-year-old student Amos Dudley made of his teeth. The model labeled "3" rests on a 3-D-printed tray Dudley made to make impressions of his teeth with a putty-like material. Also in the box are a clear plastic aligner and other 3-D models used to make more aligners, each one pushing the problematic teeth further into place. Jon Kalish for NPR hide caption

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New Jersey Student Uses 3-D Printer For DIY Dental Work

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Zhenan Bao, a chemical engineer at Stanford University, is working to invent an artificial skin from plastic that can sense, heal and power itself. The thin plastic sheets are made with built-in pressure sensors. Bao Research Group hide caption

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Just Like Human Skin, This Plastic Sheet Can Sense And Heal

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A "new" Rembrandt portrait is actually the creation of a 3-D printer — and a statistical analysis of 346 paintings by the Dutch master. Robert Harrison/J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam hide caption

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A 'New' Rembrandt: From The Frontiers Of AI And Not The Artist's Atelier

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SolarReserve's Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Plant, located near Tonopah, Nev., features an array of 10,347 mirrors arranged in a circle 1.75 miles across. A 640-foot-tall tower glows when the sun's energy is concentrated and directed to the top. SolarReserve hide caption

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Solar And Wind Energy May Be Nice, But How Can We Store It?

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An attendant wearing an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset demonstrates a glove with a Yamaha Corp. rubber-like sensor at the Wearable Expo in Tokyo, on Jan. 13. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Oculus Rift Launch Makes A Splash. Will It Lead A Wave Of VR Tech?

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Fernando Boiteux tosses Emily, a remote-controlled lifesaving device, into the waters off the shore of the Greek island of Lesbos. Boiteux, an assistant fire chief from Los Angeles, is helping train Greek first responders to use Emily. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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How A High-Tech Buoy Named Emily Could Save Migrants Off Greece

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While other automakers are working on a gradual progression toward more automation in cars, Google has its eyes on a fully automated self-driving car. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Google Makes The Case For A Hands-Off Approach To Self-Driving Cars

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Rice University's FlatCam is thinner than a dime. Jeff Fitlow/Rice University hide caption

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Bulky Cameras, Meet The Lens-less FlatCam

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Dave Rauchwerk is CEO of Next Thing Co., which makes the CHIP computer. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Can A $9 Computer Spark A New Wave Of Tinkering And Innovation?

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The plastic sheet invented by Stanford University chemical engineer Zhenan Bao and her colleagues can be inserted in lithium-ion batteries to avoid overheating. Zheng Chen/Courtesy of Zhenan Bao hide caption

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Batteries With A Less Fiery Future

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