An American black bear (they are often brown) is seen in Yosemite National Park. Rangers hope tracking the bears' locations will help prevent the animals from being hit by cars. Yosemite National Park via AP hide caption

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Yosemite National Park via AP

Yosemite Rangers Use Technology To Save Bears From Cars

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Code for America founder and Executive Director Jennifer Pahlka speaks Nov. 10 at The New York Times DealBook Conference at Lincoln Center in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for The New York Ti hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for The New York Ti

How Can You Bring Innovation To Government Services? Follow Users

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Carmen Aguilar y Wedge is the co-founder and director of creative technology for Hyphen-Labs. She modeled the company's ScatterViz visor at the Sundance Film Festival in January. Nina Gregory/NPR hide caption

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Nina Gregory/NPR

Covert Fashion Provides Camouflage Against Surveillance Software

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Pilot models of self-driving cars for Uber are displayed in Pittsburgh. Autonomous vehicles are expected to cut traffic jams, but not before enough human drivers are off the road. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Self-Driving Cars Could Ease Our Commutes, But That'll Take A While

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A Syrian woman and her child sit in their refugee living space in Lebanon. They are featured in Four Walls, a virtual reality presentation by the International Rescue Committee. YouVisit Studios hide caption

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YouVisit Studios

Can Virtual Reality Make You More Empathetic?

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As more people turn to laser displays for holiday house decorations, aviation authorities warn not to shine them into the sky. TeleBrands hide caption

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TeleBrands

For Christmas Thrills Without The Spills, More Decorators Turn To Lasers

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Researchers at Cornell University have developed a soft robotic hand with a touch delicate enough to sort tomatoes and find the ripest one. Huichan Zhao/Organic Robotics Lab, Cornell University hide caption

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Huichan Zhao/Organic Robotics Lab, Cornell University

People listen to the radio as the results of the presidential elections are announced in Kireka, Uganda, in February. Many rural Ugandans don't have Internet access, and the radio is a central source of news — and platform for citizens' opinions. Isaac Kasamani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Isaac Kasamani/AFP/Getty Images

Quid found 228,912 English-language stories in the news and on the blogs about Clinton's health between Sept. 12 and Oct. 12. Quid hide caption

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Quid

Pundits Vs. Machine: Who Did Better At Predicting Campaign Controversies?

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Otto developed technology to allow big-rig trucks to drive themselves. Uber, another transportation company working on self-driving technology, acquired Otto in August. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

For The Long Haul, Self-Driving Trucks May Pave The Way Before Cars

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The original caption to this 1989 photo read, "Cellular phones are being offered by many car manufacturers as optional equipment for drivers who can't bear to be out of touch, even on the road." Richard Sheinwald/AP hide caption

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Richard Sheinwald/AP

When Phones Went Mobile: Revisiting NPR's 1983 Story On 'Cellular'

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Quid, a data analytics firm, uses proprietary software to search, visualize and analyze text. Quid hide caption

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Quid

Pundits Vs. Machine: Predicting Controversies In The Presidential Race

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Tollbooth cashier Henry Gregorio collects change from drivers at the New Rochelle Toll Plaza on I-95. Gregorio has worked in a tollbooth since 1980. Tollbooths are gradually being replaced by E-ZPass technology. Stephen Nessen/WNYC hide caption

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Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Music, Spies And Exact Change: The Strange History Of Electronic Tolls

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A self-driving car leaves Uber's newest riverside hub in Pittsburgh. Company officials say the Rust Belt city is perfect for beta testing, citing diverse topography, frequent weather maladies, near-constant construction and hundreds of bridges and tunnels. Megan Harris/WESA hide caption

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Megan Harris/WESA

What It's Like To Ride In A (Nearly) Self-Driving Uber

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