As more people turn to laser displays for holiday house decorations, aviation authorities warn not to shine them into the sky. TeleBrands hide caption

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TeleBrands

For Christmas Thrills Without The Spills, More Decorators Turn To Lasers

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Researchers at Cornell University have developed a soft robotic hand with a touch delicate enough to sort tomatoes and find the ripest one. Huichan Zhao/Organic Robotics Lab, Cornell University hide caption

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Huichan Zhao/Organic Robotics Lab, Cornell University

People listen to the radio as the results of the presidential elections are announced in Kireka, Uganda, in February. Many rural Ugandans don't have Internet access, and the radio is a central source of news — and platform for citizens' opinions. Isaac Kasamani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Isaac Kasamani/AFP/Getty Images

Quid found 228,912 English-language stories in the news and on the blogs about Clinton's health between Sept. 12 and Oct. 12. Quid hide caption

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Quid

Pundits Vs. Machine: Who Did Better At Predicting Campaign Controversies?

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Otto developed technology to allow big-rig trucks to drive themselves. Uber, another transportation company working on self-driving technology, acquired Otto in August. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

For The Long Haul, Self-Driving Trucks May Pave The Way Before Cars

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The original caption to this 1989 photo read, "Cellular phones are being offered by many car manufacturers as optional equipment for drivers who can't bear to be out of touch, even on the road." Richard Sheinwald/AP hide caption

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Richard Sheinwald/AP

When Phones Went Mobile: Revisiting NPR's 1983 Story On 'Cellular'

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Quid, a data analytics firm, uses proprietary software to search, visualize and analyze text. Quid hide caption

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Quid

Pundits Vs. Machine: Predicting Controversies In The Presidential Race

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Tollbooth cashier Henry Gregorio collects change from drivers at the New Rochelle Toll Plaza on I-95. Gregorio has worked in a tollbooth since 1980. Tollbooths are gradually being replaced by E-ZPass technology. Stephen Nessen/WNYC hide caption

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Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Music, Spies And Exact Change: The Strange History Of Electronic Tolls

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A self-driving car leaves Uber's newest riverside hub in Pittsburgh. Company officials say the Rust Belt city is perfect for beta testing, citing diverse topography, frequent weather maladies, near-constant construction and hundreds of bridges and tunnels. Megan Harris/WESA hide caption

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Megan Harris/WESA

What It's Like To Ride In A (Nearly) Self-Driving Uber

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An early version of the QWERTY keyboard appears on this late 1870s typewriter. Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

QWERTY Traveled From Typewriter To iPhone, But Alternative Keyboards Do Exist

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A customer tries the Siri voice recognition function on an Apple iPhone 6 Plus in Hong Kong. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Voice Recognition Software Finally Beats Humans At Typing, Study Finds

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At Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia, Calif., riders of the New Revolution Virtual Reality Coaster wear VR goggles to play a video game while the roller coaster twists and turns. Courtesy of Six Flags hide caption

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Courtesy of Six Flags

On Six Flags' Virtual Reality Coaster, The Ride Is Just Half The Thrill

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Words classified according to their gender, as the word embedding sees it. Words below the line are words that (generally) should be gendered, while words above the line are problematic if gendered. Adam Kalai hide caption

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Adam Kalai

The UNL NIMBUS Lab drone team hopes their technology will help ensure safer prescribed burns by keeping firefighters out of dangerous terrain. Ariana Brocious/NET News hide caption

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Ariana Brocious/NET News

Drones That Launch Flaming Balls Are Being Tested To Help Fight Wildfires

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"There is plenty of room at the bottom": An excerpt from a landmark 1959 lecture by physicist Richard Feynman is written on a sheet of copper with chlorine atoms. Otte Lab/Delft University of Technology hide caption

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Otte Lab/Delft University of Technology

Michigan State University researchers Sunpreet Arora (left), Anil Jain (center) and Kai Cao (right) tried 3-D printed fingertips and 2-D fingerprint replicas on conductive paper to unlock a murder victim's phone, similar to one in the photo. Derrick Turner/Michigan State University hide caption

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Derrick Turner/Michigan State University

Concertgoers use their cellphones during a Fifth Harmony concert March 23, 2015, in New York. The company Yondr created a locking pouch to hold phones during performances, creating a "phone-free zone." Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Lock Screen: At These Music Shows, Phones Go In A Pouch And Don't Come Out

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Eric Frumin (right) stands in front of his solar panels on the roof of his Brooklyn home alongside architect David Cunningham (left) and AeonSolar's Allen Frishman (center). Courtesy of Eric Frumin hide caption

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Courtesy of Eric Frumin

Students at Do Space learn to use a laser cutter during a crash course on how to design a key chain. Joy Carey/NET News hide caption

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Joy Carey/NET News

In Omaha, A Library With No Books Brings Technology To All

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