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Better At Shopping Than Reading Owner's Manuals

LG shows off a set-top box at the Consumer Electronics Show that will will upgrade a conventional televison to a smart TV. David Becker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Becker/Getty Images

LG shows off a set-top box at the Consumer Electronics Show that will will upgrade a conventional televison to a smart TV.

David Becker/Getty Images

Millions of Americans already have bought a "connected TV," i.e., a broadband HDTV model that can connect directly to the Internet. That means consumers can use their new large-screen TVs to get all sorts of interactive online services.

"Connected TV should be a home run," James McQuivey, a media analyst with Forrester Research, said Thursday at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

One problem: Once consumers get the TVs home, they don't use the Internet connection.

"People don't get why they would want it," he said in a speech about his firm's research into consumer behaviors. "The majority don't connect the TV at all."

Forrester estimates that by 2015, about one third of all U.S. households will own a connected TV. The industry's challenge will be to persuade people to actually hook them up to the Internet, McQuivey said.