Concertgoers use their cellphones during a Fifth Harmony concert March 23, 2015, in New York. The company Yondr created a locking pouch to hold phones during performances, creating a "phone-free zone." Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Lock Screen: At These Music Shows, Phones Go In A Pouch And Don't Come Out

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Should texting be allowed at some movie screenings? Brand New Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Clash Of The Screens: Should Movie Theaters Allow Texting? AMC Says Maybe

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A Real-Life Tax Scam: This Is What IRS Phone Fraud Sounds Like

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Justin Worst, Marlo Webber and Jes Waldrip show off an LED light implant. Grindhouse Wetware calls it the Northstar. Courtesy of Ryan O'Shea hide caption

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'Body Hacking' Movement Rises Ahead Of Moral Answers

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The Yik Yak app allows users to post anonymous messages, and to read anonymous messages posted in their current location. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Yik Yak Tests Universities' Defense Of Free Speech

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IBM's Watson analyzes a Twitter account of an unnamed user, breaking down needs, values and five personality traits: openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness, neuroticism (aka emotional range). IBM hide caption

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I Asked A Computer To Be My Life Coach

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There are a lot of ways to donate to a cause online. While using social media may help in promotion, it may not be the most effective way to get people to actually give. Tomacco/Getty Images hide caption

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Monitored by researchers and cameras, a study participant drives while using hands-free technology. New AAA research found that these technologies are distracting even after they're used. Dan Campbell/American Automobile Association hide caption

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A cable box on top of a television in Philadelphia. One analyst finds that economics is the key driver behind the growing phenomenon of "cord-nevers," people who never subscribed to cable or satellite TV. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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The rise of ad blockers threatens the business model that drives much of the Internet economy. Danae Munoz/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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With Ad Blocking Use On The Rise, What Happens To Online Publishers?

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That little red "message" light may not be as ubiquitous in offices as it used to be. Photo illustration: Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Businesses Are Hanging Up On Voice Mail To Dial In Productivity

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In the face-to-face interview process, research shows that managers tend to hire applicants who are similar to them on paper. Bjorn Rune Lie/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Blind Auditions Could Give Employers A Better Hiring Sense

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Comedian Aziz Ansari became a pioneer of emoji language use in 2011, when he transcribed the hit Jay-Z and Kanye West song, "Ni**as In Paris." azizisbored.tumblr.com hide caption

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As Emojis Spread Beyond Texts, Many Remain [Confounded Face] [Interrobang]

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More Americans are ditching traditional cash and plastic, opting instead for new mobile payment applications. But new research indicates cash isn't completely dead. Amy Sancetta/AP hide caption

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Is Cash-Free Really The Way To Be? Maybe Not For Millennials

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Google is doing test flights of its balloons carrying Internet routers around the world. Last June, a balloon was released at the airport in Teresina, Brazil. Google hide caption

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Bringing Internet To The Far Corners Of The Earth

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With the technology to conduct more nuanced tests, some companies say they can provide more useful detail about how people think in dynamic situations. Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Recruiting Better Talent With Brain Games And Big Data

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