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ChocQuibTown Speaks Out On Racism In Colombia

Chocquibtown perform onstage during the 11th annual Latin GRAMMY Awards at the Mandalay Bay Events Center on November 11, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Kevin Winter/getty images hide caption

toggle caption Kevin Winter/getty images

Chocquibtown perform onstage during the 11th annual Latin GRAMMY Awards at the Mandalay Bay Events Center on November 11, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Kevin Winter/getty images

English / Spanish

The truth hurts.

That's a typical comment left on this article, published in People En Español, about statements made by the Colombian hip-hop group ChocQuibTown about racism in its country.

During an interview on Al Punto Con Jorge Ramos on Univision, the group didn't hold back. It expressed frustration with the institutional racism found in Colombian media (no blacks in popular telenovelas), as well as in society in general.

The members of CQT are descendants of the country's history with the slave trade and come from the predominately Afro Pacific Coast. Their music reflects their heritage and the messages in their music have resonated with Afro Colombians around the country, as well as with non-blacks. The group is in town to perform during the Grammy Awards telecast this Sunday night; it's also nominated for Best Latin Rock, Alternative or Urban Album.

I couldn't help but listen intently when band member Carlos "Tostado" Valencia spoke about people who don't even realize they are expressing feelings or ideas that could be interpreted as racist.

He went on to say that he and the other members of CQT are using their music to promote change in their country.

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English / Spanish

Chocquibtown Denuncia El Racismo En Colombia

"La verdad duele."

Ese tipo de comentarios de lectores abundan en este articulo, publicado en People En Español, acerca de las denuncias que hizo recientemente el grupo de hip hop Colombiano ChocQuibTown sobre le racismo en su país.

Durante una entrevista en Al Punto Con Jorge Ramos en Univisión, el grupo expresó frustración con el racismo de los medios Colombianos (por ejemplo los afro descendientes no figuran en las telenovelas populares) y en la sociedad en general.

Los miembros de CQT provienen de la costa pacífica de Colombia, una zona predominantemente afro descendiente. Su música refleja esa herencia y los mensajes que transmiten han resonado con la población afro colombiana, y con el resto del país. El domingo el grupo cantará en los premios Grammy; también están nominados a un premio por mejor banda latina de rock, alternativa o música urbana.

Escuché atentamente las palabras de Carlos "Tostado" Valencia, miembro de la agrupación, cuando dijo que la gente ni siquiera se da cuenta de su propio racismo. Usan expresiones o ideas que son popularmente aceptadas, pero de todos modos ofenden.

También Valencia explicó que el y otros miembros de CQT están usando su música para promover el cambio en Colombia.

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