NPR logo

Ring In The New Year, 'Screwmbia' Style

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461406153/461407874" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Ring In The New Year, 'Screwmbia' Style

Our Show

Ring In The New Year, 'Screwmbia' Style

Ring In The New Year, 'Screwmbia' Style

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461406153/461407874" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

This New Year's Eve, don't forget to dance. Alt.Latino can help. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

This New Year's Eve, don't forget to dance. Alt.Latino can help.

iStockphoto

What's a New Year's Eve party without music?

This week, Texas DJ Luis Espada (a.k.a. King Louie) of the Peligrosa collective visits Alt.Latino to share samples of the style they created — the one they call "screwmbia."

The music is much more than a bunch of creative types taking liberties with an established dance form, in this case cumbia. It is, in fact, an in-the-moment expression of a major cultural shift among Latinos as they get in touch with a heritage that hasn't been a part of how they self-identify. This is the sound of music-makers getting back in touch with their roots, one remixed song at a time, and in the process creating a movement that reverberates beyond the parties and clubs of their home base in southern Texas.

If I made that sound like sound like something out of a PhD thesis, never fear. The music Peligrosa creates is exciting, fresh and so, so danceable.

Happy New Year from your pals at Alt.Latino!

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.