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#OscarsSoWhite, But Here's How To Break Hollywood's Rules
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#OscarsSoWhite, But Here's How To Break Hollywood's Rules

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#OscarsSoWhite, But Here's How To Break Hollywood's Rules

#OscarsSoWhite, But Here's How To Break Hollywood's Rules
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467975918/468120017" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Issues of diversity cloud the annual celebration of the Oscars this year. (Or is it the Emilios?) i

Issues of diversity cloud the annual celebration of the Oscars this year. (Or is it the Emilios?) Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Scott Olson/Getty Images
Issues of diversity cloud the annual celebration of the Oscars this year. (Or is it the Emilios?)

Issues of diversity cloud the annual celebration of the Oscars this year. (Or is it the Emilios?)

Scott Olson/Getty Images

On Sunday night, the 88th annual Academy Awards will once again gather together the movie industry in a lavish ceremony to acknowledge the year's most celebrated performances and films. For some, though, the Oscars represent just another instance of the cool kids gussied up for prom night, trying to ignore The Others gathered by the punch bowl.

This and last year's Oscars brought a chorus of indignation about the lack of diversity in the nominations for the four acting categories: In two years combined, the 40 nominated performances featured not one person of color. It's become the story of the Oscars this year, perhaps even more than the nominated movies and performances themselves.

So at Alt.Latino, we decided not to pile on, but to instead recommend a diverse list of actors and filmmakers who've flourished in spite of Hollywood's troubles. We asked our pal and favorite movie-going partner Bob Mondello, NPR's film critic for All Things Considered, to join this week's show and offer his own knowledge and perspectives. Listen in and let us know what you think.

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