About 100 water voles are being reintroduced at Malham Tarn, a lake in North Yorkshire in England. This is the first time the endangered mammals have been seen in the area in 50 years. Richard Rayner/North News & Pictures Ltd/National Trust hide caption

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Mother Bird's Song Helps Her Young Cope With Global Warming

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"An Old Walrus, Or 'Morse' " was drawn by Henry Wood Elliott in 1872. He included it in his book Our Arctic Province, next to a description of a walrus haulout in Alaska's Punuk Islands in 1874. Wikimedia hide caption

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Fisherman Helps Shark That Is Too Tired To Swim Off On Its Own

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Bird Myth Busters: Do Birds Fly To The Moon In Winter? And Other Unknowns

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Three parasitic worms (from left): male blood fluke, which can range in size from 0.2 inches to 4 inches; tapeworm, which can grow up to 30 feet in length; and microfilaria. The images were color enhanced. David Scharf, Biophoto Associates and Eye Of Science/Science Source hide caption

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A Santa Catalina Island fox pup dashes into the wilderness after being released on Santa Catalina Island off the coast of Southern California. The Catalina Island fox was one of the world's most endangered species, but it has been upgraded to "threatened." Kevork Djansezian/AP hide caption

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Bald Eagle's Comeback Means Bad News For Other Rare Birds

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The long lifespan of the Greenland shark, shown here in the cold, deep waters of the Uummannaq Fjord, may only be surpassed by that of the ocean quahog, a clam known to live as long as 507 years. Julius Nielsen/Science hide caption

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Talk About An Ancient Mariner! Greenland Shark Is At Least 272 Years Old

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The underwater construction skills of the caddis fly larva have caught the interest of bioengineers. The larva tapes and glues pebbles together to form a sturdy protective case. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Ginger, an English bulldog, stands watch while at work with her owner, Will Pisnieski, at Authentic Entertainment in Burbank, Calif., in 2012. According to the Society for Human Resource Management, 7 percent of employers allow pets at work. Grant Hindsley/AP hide caption

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Who Let The Dogs In? More Companies Welcome Pets At Work

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In this file photo, a professor holds a tray of stem cells at the University of Connecticut. The NIH plans to lift a moratorium on funding studies using human stem cells in animal embryos. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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The Chimera Quandary: Is It Ethical To Create Hybrid Embryos?

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Saving The Tricolored Blackbird

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This is what's called a "specimen lot" — a large mason jar holding smaller vials of parasitic worms gathered by a researcher in 1927. The Smithsonian collection has more than 120,000 specimen lots. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

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#NPRWormWeek: Worms Are Bottled Up In The Smithsonian's Crawl Space

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Bug enthusiast Anna Lindqvist uploads photos like this — of the Ailanthus Webworm Moth (Atteva aurea) to the iNaturalist app. Like a social network for wildlife, her location paired with the photo help both amateur and expert naturalists identify the species. Annika Lindqvist hide caption

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The App That Aims To Gamify Biology Has Amateurs Discovering New Species

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The Pacific beetle cockroach, which is native to Hawaii, gives birth to live young. Yasu Ueda/Flickr hide caption

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Cockroach Milk: Yes. You Read That Right

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A rhino wakes up after its horn was trimmed at John Hume's Rhino Ranch in Klerksdorp, South Africa, on Feb. 3. South Africa's highest court is preparing to decide whether to uphold the country's domestic ban on trading rhino horn. John Hume is a private rhino owner and breeder who advocates for legalizing trade. Mujahid Safodien /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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If South Africa Lifts The Ban On Trading Rhino Horns, Will Rhinos Benefit?

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