Examining The Hummingbird Tongue

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The New Science Of Understanding Dog Behavior

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Three of Becca Francis' horses contracted EHV-1 at a horse event in Utah; one had to be euthanized. Kirk Siegler/KUNC hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/KUNC

Horse-Killing Virus Brings Fear To Western U.S.

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Adam Cole/NPR

Nature's Secret: Why Honey Bees Are Better Politicians Than Humans

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Every Thirteen Years, Brood Nineteen Is Back

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CT scans of fossil Hadrocodium skulls allowed scientists to reconstruct its brain. The olfactory bulbs, located at the front of the brain, grew steadily larger as millions of years passed. Matt Colbert/University of Texas at Austin hide caption

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Matt Colbert/University of Texas at Austin

Mammals Smelled Their Way To Bigger Brains

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Presumed Extinct, The Red-Crested Tree Rat Returns

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"Can something be called chicken or pork if it was born in a flask and produced in a vat?" asks Michael Spector. "Questions like that have rarely been asked and have never been answered." iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Burgers From A Lab: The World Of In Vitro Meat

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Several Asian clams are seen in this 1994 photo, after they were taken from San Francisco Bay. The Asian clam is one of hundreds of aquatic alien species that thrive in the Bay Area. Andrew N. Cohen/San Francisco Estuary Institute via AP hide caption

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Andrew N. Cohen/San Francisco Estuary Institute via AP

Foreign Species Invade San Francisco Bay

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Intern Lynn Brown feeds a robin at the Alabama Wildlife Center south of Birmingham. Andrew Yeager/NPR hide caption

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Wildlife Shelter Cradles Littlest Tornado Victims

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