Michael Yezzi raises 1,000 pigs a year in Shushan, N.Y. He's worried about how to keep his farm safe from a disease that has no proven cure. Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR

The CRISPR enzyme (green and red) binds to a stretch of double-stranded DNA (purple and red), preparing to snip out the faulty part. Illustration courtesy of Jennifer Doudna/UC Berkeley hide caption

itoggle caption Illustration courtesy of Jennifer Doudna/UC Berkeley

A 6-foot-long electric eel is basically a 6-inch fish attached to a 5-1/2-foot cattle prod, researchers say. The long tail is packed with special cells that pump electricity without shocking the fish. Mark Newman/Getty Images/Lonely Planet Image hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Newman/Getty Images/Lonely Planet Image

A curious cuttlefish stares back at the camera from inside The Smithsonian's National Zoo Invertebrate Exhibit. The exhibit, home to dozens of small aquatic and terrestrial species without backbones, closed on Sunday. Meghan Murphy/Smithsonian's National Zoo hide caption

itoggle caption Meghan Murphy/Smithsonian's National Zoo

A mountain lion known as P-22 was recaptured in March by National Park Service biologists and treated for mange. Wildlife officials believe the cougar's ill health is the result of exposure to rat poison. National Park Service hide caption

itoggle caption National Park Service

DNA from these crab plovers, collected in Djibouti, Africa, should help scientists figure out how the unusual species fits into the family tree, says the Smithsonian's Helen James. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Maggie Starbard/NPR