Citizen Scientists On A Mission To Find Frogs

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Across Washington State, hydroelectric dams are blocking salmon as they migrate to their spawning grounds. Enter the salmon cannon. Ingrid Taylar/Flickr hide caption

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The Salmon Cannon: Easier Than Shooting Fish Out Of A Barrel

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A great white shark swims near Guadalupe Island off the coast of Mexico in a promotional image for Discovery Channel's Shark Week in 2013. The network special Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives opened Discovery's annual Shark Week programming in 2013. Andrew Brandy Casagrande/Discovery Channel/AP hide caption

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When Wildlife Documentaries Jump The Shark

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The GoPro Fetch can fit dogs as small as 15 pounds and as large as 120 pounds. GoPro hide caption

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New GoPro Camera Harness Captures Dog's-Eye View

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Trainer Jimmy McConnell of Shelbyville, Tenn., rides champion walking horse Watch It Now before a 2009 football game in Knoxville, Tenn. Celebrations of the breed's distinctive gait are a 75-year-old tradition, but animal rights activists say that for many of those decades, the walking horse industry has abused animals to get their knees even higher. Wade Payne/AP hide caption

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Making Sure Those Walking Horses Aren't Hurting Horses

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Weekend Musher Finds Dogs Keep Her Hanging On

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New Yorkers can take city-run classes to learn how to make their homes and businesses less attractive to these guys. Ludovic Bertron/Flickr hide caption

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Rats! New York City Tries To Drain Rodent 'Reservoirs'

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Big brown bats like this one are relatively common in urban areas, sometimes roosting in buildings. Contrary to popular belief, bats rarely carry rabies and are not rodents. They belong to the order Chiroptera, which means "hand-wing." Courtesy of Robert Marquis hide caption

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Night Of The Cemetery Bats

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Researchers raised two groups of walking, air-breathing Polypterus senegalus — one on land and one on the water. They discovered that each group was able to adapt to be best suited to its environment. A. Morin, E.M. Standen, T.Y. Du, H. Larsson/McGill University hide caption

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China Accuses Panda Of Faking Pregnancies To Get Treats

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An earlier spring in Montana's Glacier National Park means full waterfalls at first — but much drier summers. Robert Glusic/Corbis hide caption

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There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

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Between A Town And Its Bears, A Star-Crossed Relationship

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South Africa Makes A Plan To Protect Rhinos From Poachers

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Pesticides Used On Florida's Mosquitoes May Harm Butterflies

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