Diabetes alert dogs are trained to detect low blood glucose in a person. The dogs can cost $20,000, but little research has been done on their effectiveness. Frank Wisneski/Flickr hide caption

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A typical Native American oyster deposit, or midden, dating to about 1,000 years ago. Archaeologists are finding clues to sustainable oysters harvesting in these remains. Torben Rick/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Call It A Cat And Cat Game

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In 2004 Reid Brewer of the University of Alaska Southeast measured an unusual beaked whale that turned up dead in Alaska's Aleutian Islands. A tissue sample from the carcass later showed that the whale was one of the newly identified species. Don Graves hide caption

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Once scientists grew these Staphylococcus lugdunensis bacteria in a lab dish, they were able to isolate a compound that's lethal to another strain commonly found in the nose that can make us sick — Staphylococcus aureus. Mostly Harmless/Flickr hide caption

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'Nose-y' Bacteria Could Yield A New Way To Fight Infection

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Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

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Four sheep cloned from the same genetic material as Dolly roam the paddocks in Nottingham, England. The University of Nottingham hide caption

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'Sister Clones' Of Dolly The Sheep Are Alive And Kicking

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Larry Is One Lucky Lobster

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Bandar, a male tiger, plays with a ball made of tough plastic in the pool to keep cool on a hot day at the National Zoo. Courtesy of Smithsonian's National Zoo hide caption

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How Does A Tiger Keep Cool In This Heat? One Word: Bloodsicles

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At Ulva Island Bird Sanctuary on Stewart Island, New Zealand, a sign warned visitors in 2008 to check their bags. The fight against invasive predators continues. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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A typical hoverfly (Spilomyia diophthalma) Fredrik Sjöberg/Fredrik Sjöberg hide caption

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The Uppermost Aristocracy of the Hoverfly Society

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Yao honey hunter Orlando Yassene holds a male greater honeyguide temporarily captured for research in the Niassa National Reserve, Mozambique. The birds will flutter in front of people, tweet and fly from tree to tree to guide hunters to bees' nests that are hidden inside the trunks of hollow trees. This teamwork could date back thousands or even a million years. Claire Spottiswoode hide caption

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How Wild Birds Team Up With Humans To Guide Them To Honey

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