A rescued manatee suffering from exposure to an algae bloom called red tide in southwest Florida comes up for air as it swims into a critical care tank at Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo. Steve Nesius/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Jonathan Wilker holds up a group of oysters from a tank in his lab at Purdue University. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Thousands of "fairy circles" dot the landscape of the NamibRand Nature Reserve in Namibia. Why these barren circles appear in grassland areas has puzzled scientists for years. N. Juergens/AAAS/Science hide caption

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Workers clear honey from dead beehives at a bee farm east of Merced, Calif. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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On Australia's Heron Island, buff-banded rails like this one have become the avian equivalent of a weed. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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The bucardo, or Pyrenean ibex, lived high in the Pyrenees until its extinction in 2000. Three years later, researchers attempted to clone Celia, the last bucardo. The clone died minutes after birth. Taxidermic specimen, Regional Government of Aragon, Spain Robb Kendrick/National Geographic hide caption

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The Picture Show

It's Called 'De-Extinction' — It's Like 'Jurassic Park,' Except It's Real

Science writer Carl Zimmer says we're not going to bring back dinosaurs. But we might be able to resurrect other extinct species.

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