During a raid on a Missouri dogfighting ring, Tim Rickey of the ASPCA holds Dharma, a pit bull who lost part of her leg in a fight. Courtesy of the Humane Society of Missouri hide caption

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DNA Is New Weapon In Fight Against Dogfighting

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Wildlife biologist Anthony Fischbach observes a tagged walrus near Point Lay, Alaska, earlier this month. Tens of thousands of walruses have come ashore in northwest Alaska because the sea ice they normally rest on has melted. U.S. Geological Survey/AP hide caption

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Biologist Tracks Walruses Forced Ashore As Ice Melts

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Cheetahs walk across a savannah at the Mashatu game reserve in Botswana. Cameron Spencer/Getty Images Europe hide caption

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Wildlife Films: Seeing But Not Always Believing

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Defining Human Uniqueness In 'Almost Chimpanzee'

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A male Florida panther walks down Jane's Scenic Drive in Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park. Before scientists bred the Florida panthers with cats from Texas, they lacked vitality and were near extinction. Science/AAAS hide caption

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Bounding, Rebounding: Panthers Make A Comeback

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This handout photo from New Zealand's Department of Conservation shows one of 40 pilot whales that died after beaching themselves at Spirits Bay, northwest of Auckland. Department of Conservation/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Gorant is a senior editor at Sports Illustrated. Deanne Fitzmaurice hide caption

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The Road To Recovery For Michael Vick's Dogs

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The Origins Of The Word 'Cell'

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Why Are These Crows So Good With Tools?

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Archaeologists have unearthed a wealth of new information about dinosaurs in the past decade thanks in large part to new technology.  But the T. Rex's telegenic charisma and popular appeal are something that even scientists aren't immune from. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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T. Rex Renaissance: Big Decade For Dino Research

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Explorers Assess The Health Of The World’s Oceans

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Smoke rises from surface oil being burned near the Deepwater Horizon blowout. The well spewed nearly five million barrels of oil, making it the world's largest accidental marine oil spill. Joel Sartore/National Geographic hide caption

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Assessing The BP Spill's Impact

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