"Bees are vital to the pollination and production of our fruits and vegetables ... unfortunately, they're all in trouble" — Marla Spivak James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

"In habitats that are pretty much untouched, the sound is organized and structured in such a way so that each critter establishes its own bandwidth" — Bernie Kraus James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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TED Radio Hour

Bernie Krause: How Does Listening To Nature Teach Us About Changing Habitats?

Bernie Krause says you can hear how radically environments change through his recordings of nature.

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Biologists Laura Herren and Brian Lapointe bag red sea grass at Shorty's Pocket, a site in the Indian River lagoon. Manatees have died from eating the toxic macro algae. Courtesy Brian Cousin/FAU Harbor Branch hide caption

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A Costa Rican banana worker carries a stalk of freshly harvested fruit on a plantation in Costa Rica, where many of the bananas that Americans eat are grown. Kent Gilbert/AP hide caption

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Sea urchins are considered a culinary delicacy, but supply can't keep up with demand. Aizat Faiz/Flickr hide caption

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