A cruise ship passes Venice's St. Mark's Square at sunset in September. Up to 90,000 tourists fill the city every day, far outnumbering the 55,000 residents. Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images

As Tourists Crowd Out Locals, Venice Faces 'Endangered' List

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Amatrice's Basilica di San Francesco was among many centuries-old buildings damaged in Italy's Aug. 24 quake. The national police's art squad is documenting damage and salvaging priceless works of art from this and other churches in the region. Italian Carabinieri /AP hide caption

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Italian Carabinieri /AP

When Cultural Heritage Is At Risk, Italy's Art Police Come To The Rescue

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People walk past a replica of an ancient statue of a human-headed winged bull from Nimrud, Iraq, destroyed by the Islamic State. It's part of an exhibition called "Rising from Destruction" at Rome's Colosseum. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Replicas Of Artifacts Destroyed By ISIS 'Rising From Destruction' In Rome

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How An Architect Used Striking Design To Capture New Smithsonian's Meaning

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People look out at the former site of the World Trade Center in New York City in 2005, where construction had started on Freedom Tower. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Smithsonian's Arts and Industries Building first opened to the public in October 1881, though back then it was known as the U.S. National Museum. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Top row: The Age of Magic by The Mouse Market, Gothic Bath by Samuel C. Miller III, Apartment 6D by Nix Gerber Studio. Bottom row: White House, White Room by J. Ford Huffman, Reverie of the Stars by Mars Tokyo Designs, My Castle and My Keep by Daisy Tainton. From "Small Stories: At Home In A Dollhouse" at the National Building Museum. Courtesy of the National Building Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Building Museum

'The Battle For Home' Traces Syria's History Through Architecture

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The Architecture Project Behind Obama's Chicago Presidential Library

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U.S. Agency Tries Radical Rehab Technique On Aging Government Buildings

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The Triborough Bridge is seen under construction in New York City on July 10, 1935. The bridge, now known as the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge, connects Long Island with Manhattan. The Dutch Prime Minister is a fan of the biographer of Robert Moses, who was involved in building the bridge. Associated Press hide caption

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Associated Press