Between 1999 and 2014, the number of deaths in the U.S. from prescribed opioids quadrupled. Meanwhile medical students were getting very little training on how to spot patients who are at risk for addiction, or how to treat it. Matt Lincol/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

toggle caption Matt Lincol/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Protesters with the Black Lives Matter movement and other groups march through downtown Philadelphia during the Democratic National Convention. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When your health insurer reclassifies a prescription drug you take from tier 1 to tier 2, it can sharply increase the portion of the drug's cost that you're expected to pay. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

In Lake Huron, Underwater Treasures, And A Marine Sanctuary, Boost Tourism Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487522863/487522864" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More Than Just Saying 'Cheese,' Hundreds Sit Test To Become Official Experts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487522856/487522857" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Clinton Legacy On Fighting Crime And What Democrats Have Learned From It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487522835/487522836" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Why The Public Perception Of Crime Exceeds The Reality

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487522807/487522808" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michael Peterson, an archaeologist at Redwood National Park in California, photographs the coastline annually to monitor erosion of archaeological sites. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

toggle caption Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix

As Storms Erode California's Cliffs, Buried Village Could Get Washed Away

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486471614/487522894" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images

A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487391863/487522870" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Four sheep cloned from the same genetic material as Dolly roam the paddocks in Nottingham, England. The University of Nottingham hide caption

toggle caption The University of Nottingham

'Sister Clones' Of Dolly The Sheep Are Alive And Kicking

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487047575/487522876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Helen Gurley Brown in her office at Cosmopolitan magazine in the 1960s .The legendary editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)." Santi Visalli/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Santi Visalli/Getty Images