Gov. Bill Clinton shakes hands with the crowd as he arrives at a rally being held for him in Hartford, Conn., in March 1992. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Cole/AP

A glitched Little Mermaid piece sits in front of a dismal castle as part of the artist Banksy's biggest show to date, titled Dismaland, at Tropicana in Weston-super-Mare, England. Yui Mok/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Yui Mok/PA Photos/Landov

Paul Durand-Ruel, shown above in his gallery in 1910, acquired some 5,000 impressionist works — long before others were buying them. Dornac/Durand-Ruel & Cie/Courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art hide caption

itoggle caption Dornac/Durand-Ruel & Cie/Courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art

Rontherin Ratliff's Things that Float sculpture contains photographs he rescued from his grandmother's drowned house. Courtesy of Rontherin Ratliff hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Rontherin Ratliff

Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring stares back at cellphones at the Frick Collection in New York City. "The art museum used to offer objects, works of art, the finest that we have," Lewis says. "And it's gone from offering objects to offering an experience." Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi, seen here in his New York studio in 1940, exhibited with Georgia O'Keeffe and Edward Hopper. But his work was quickly forgotten after his death in 1953. Alfredo Valente/Alfredo Valente papers/ Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution hide caption

itoggle caption Alfredo Valente/Alfredo Valente papers/ Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

In 16th century Italy, the nobility began decorating their tables with "triumphs" made entirely from folded napkins. The art form had pretty much died out by the time artist Joan Sallas began studying centuries-old illustrations and taught himself how to re-create them. Photo from The Beauty of the Fold: A Conversation With Joan Sallas. Courtesy of Charlotte Birnbaum/Sternberg Press hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Charlotte Birnbaum/Sternberg Press

A photo of Pablo Picasso's painting, Head of a Young Woman, released by French authorities on Tuesday. The painting was seized from a yacht on July 31 in Corsica, France. The painting belongs to a Spanish billionaire who was planning to sell it elsewhere in Europe. But Spanish authorities say it is a "national treasure" that can't be sent abroad without government permission. Douane Francaise via AP hide caption

itoggle caption Douane Francaise via AP

Le louche refers to the transformation that happens when water is added to absinthe, turning the liquor from a deep green to a milky, iridescent shade. At left, a classic pour. At right, an absinthe glass fitted with a brouilleur, a device that holds the ice and lets water slowly drip down. Courtesy of Scott MacDonald hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Scott MacDonald

The Ogden Museum of Southern Art's "The Rising" exhibition includes portraits (by photographer Jonathan Traviesa) of the day laborers who helped rebuild New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Jonathan Traviesa/Courtesy of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art hide caption

itoggle caption Jonathan Traviesa/Courtesy of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art

When the reservations were established and peace made between the Apsáalooke and the Lakota, there were frequent visits between the tribes. The result was that Lakota warbonnets, pipebags and even pipes were placed in Crow hands. Jenae Neeson/Courtesy of the Brinton Museum hide caption

itoggle caption Jenae Neeson/Courtesy of the Brinton Museum

Weaving is only the first step. From the weaver the hat passes through the hands of a series of artisans with Hemingway-esque titles: the rematador, the cortador, the apeleador and the planchador. Roff Smith for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Roff Smith for NPR

The Tulane City Center helped design and build New Orleans' Grow Dat Youth Farm, which employs local, disadvantaged high school students and teaches them about urban agriculture. Will Crocker/Courtesy of Tulane University hide caption

itoggle caption Will Crocker/Courtesy of Tulane University

Sultan 'Ali 'Adil Shah II Slays a Tiger (ca. 1660) is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's critically acclaimed Sultans of Deccan India, 1500-1700 Opulence and Fantasy exhibition. The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Lent by Howard Hodgkin./Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art hide caption

itoggle caption The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Lent by Howard Hodgkin./Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Fibers from the fique plant, dyed with natural pigments by artist Susana Mejia, are part of the Waterweavers exhibit. In the photo above, the fibers hang to dry in the Amazon jungle. Jorge Montoya hide caption

itoggle caption Jorge Montoya

Demonstrators protested the death of Michael Brown on last summer in Ferguson, Mo., even as police sprayed pepper spray, shot smoke, gas and flash grenades. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

This gargantuan beauty was built during the 1999 Delaware State News Sandcastle Contest. The castle was lost all too soon in a tragic high-tide accident. Grant L. Gursky/Associated Press hide caption

itoggle caption Grant L. Gursky/Associated Press