Mother-Son Tag Team Design A Line Of Clothes For Kids With Disabilities
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The Panama Papers may help settle an ownership claim over Amedeo Modigliani's Seated Man With a Cane, which Philippe Maestracci says was seized from his grandfather by the Nazis. Christie's Images/Corbis hide caption

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Panama Papers Provide Rare Glimpse Inside Famously Opaque Art Market
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Workers tend a garden in Gomez's 2015 Jardín no 1. © Ramiro Gomez/Courtesy of Abrams hide caption

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Gardens Don't Tend Themselves: Portraits Of The People Behind LA's Luxury
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Elsa Dorfman and Allen Ginsberg. The inscription on the bottom of the photo reads, "October 15, 1988. The morning after our reception at Vision." Elsa Dorfman hide caption

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To Access Her Big, Boxy Muse, Photographer Set Her Sights On Allen Ginsberg
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A "new" Rembrandt portrait is actually the creation of a 3-D printer — and a statistical analysis of 346 paintings by the Dutch master. Robert Harrison/J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam hide caption

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A 'New' Rembrandt: From The Frontiers Of AI And Not The Artist's Atelier
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Nate Swain poses for a photo by his artwork. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Unraveled: The Mystery Of The Secret Street Artist In Boston
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Reality Show 'DIY Permits' Follows Less Glamorous Side Of Home Renovations
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Zaha Hadid stands before the Riverside Museum, her first major public commission in the U.K., in Glasgow, Scotland, in 2011. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Hadid on Fresh Air (2004)
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In Eugène Delacroix's 1827 lithograph, Mephistopheles Aloft, 1827, a demon flies over a dark city. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco/The J. Paul Getty Museum hide caption

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For 19th Century French Artists, 'Noir' Was The New Black
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An interior view of the fictional Selig family's house. Here, in the kitchen, a portal — one of many — leads out of the house into the otherworldly beyond. Lindsey Kennedy/Courtesy of Meow Wolf hide caption

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DIY Artists Paint The Town Strange, With Some Help From George R.R. Martin
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The authors of The Electric Pencil believe the "ECT" in illustration No. 197 is a reference to electrotherapy, which was part of James Edward Deeds Jr.'s treatment at State Hospital No. 3. Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press hide caption

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With Just Pencil And Paper, A Patient Found Escape Inside State Hospital No. 3
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In his barn, Bertoia would play his sculptures for small invited audiences, or by himself late at night. His sculptures are in the barn where he left them when he died in 1978. John Brien/Important Records hide caption

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Sound Sculptor Harry Bertoia Created Musical, Meditative Art
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"Satellite imagery allows us to ... record information in different parts of the light spectrum ... that we simply cannot see with our human eyes." — Sarah Parcak Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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How Can Satellite Images Unlock Secrets To Our Hidden Past?
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In a historic collaboration, the Getty and LACMA are exhibiting their massive joint acquisition of Mapplethorpe's archives. Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation/courtesy of HBO hide caption

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Robert Mapplethorpe's Provocative Art Finds A New Home In LA
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French criminologist Alphonse Bertillon's (left) techniques for identifying criminals in the late 19th century set the template that police use today. Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images hide caption

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Meet Alphonse Bertillon, The Man Behind The Modern Mug Shot
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Surrey NanoSystems, the U.K. company that makes Vantablack, describes it as "a functionalised 'forest' of millions upon millions of incredibly small tubes made of carbon, or carbon nanotubes." Surrey NanoSystems/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Encore: Housing Costs Inspire London Builders To Create Underground Mansions
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