Over the past three decades, Arthur and Cynthia Wood turned their four-story home into a work of art. They purchased the brick tenement at the intersection of Downing and Quincy streets in 1979 for $2,100 in cash. Courtesy of Chris Wood hide caption

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Restorer Nicoletta Rinaldi works on the ceiling of the Hall of Mirrors at the Versailles Palace, west of Paris, in 2007. Remy de la Mauviniere/AP hide caption

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"Beauty is not just for the imagination. It's actually a way of altering human behavior for the better." — Bill Strickland TED hide caption

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TED Radio Hour

Bill Strickland: Can Beauty Change A Life?

Civic leader Bill Strickland says beauty can rescue young people from poverty.

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Cameron Russell at TEDxMidAtlantic David Quinalty/TED hide caption

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TED Radio Hour

Cameron Russell: Does Being Beautiful Make You Happy?

Cameron Russell has spent the last decade modeling. Being beautiful has given her unexpected gifts, and believe it or not, a fair dose of insecurity.

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Philosopher Denis Dutton suggests that humans are hard-wired to seek beauty. James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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TED Radio Hour

Denis Dutton: Are Some Things Universally Beautiful?

Philosopher Denis Dutton says the places and people we find attractive can be traced to the preferences of ancient man.

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Leap into the Void, 1960 (Yves Klein, Harry Shunk and Jean Kender) The Metropolitan Museum of Art/Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art hide caption

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The bucardo, or Pyrenean ibex, lived high in the Pyrenees until its extinction in 2000. Three years later, researchers attempted to clone Celia, the last bucardo. The clone died minutes after birth. Taxidermic specimen, Regional Government of Aragon, Spain Robb Kendrick/National Geographic hide caption

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The Picture Show

It's Called 'De-Extinction' — It's Like 'Jurassic Park,' Except It's Real

Science writer Carl Zimmer says we're not going to bring back dinosaurs. But we might be able to resurrect other extinct species.

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Courtesy the artist/John Baldessari Studio

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