The right eye of Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa." On Aug. 21, 1911, the then-little-known painting was stolen from the wall of the Louvre in Paris. And a legend was born. Associated Press hide caption

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Fine Art

The Theft That Made The 'Mona Lisa' A Masterpiece

A century ago, on a quiet morning in Paris, three men dressed as museum workers walked out of the Louvre with what was then a little-known Renaissance portrait.

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The High Museum of Art commissioned nendo, a Japanese design collective, to create Visible Structures — a 12-piece installation of furniture made out of form core and cardboard, reinforced with graphite tape. Masayuki Hayashi hide caption

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Alfred Stieglitz attached this photograph to a letter for Georgia O'Keeffe, dated July 10, 1929. Below the photograph he wrote, "I have destroyed 300 prints to-day. And much more literature. I haven't the heart to destroy this..." Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library hide caption

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Brigid Schulte's beloved green 1995 Volvo. Courtesy of Brigid Schulte hide caption

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Isaiah Saxon (left), Sean Hellfritsch and Daren Rabinovitch began collaborating on films in San Francisco in 2003. Their digital animation company, Encyclopedia Pictura, combines live action, stop-motion and CGI components into a unique visual style. Courtesy of Encyclopedia Pictura hide caption

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Watercolor, Portuguese Slaver Diligenté, 1838. Courtesy Lonnie Bunch hide caption

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The characters Lily (shown) and Snow Flower exchange secret messages written between the folds of a fan. Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures hide caption

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