Kumu (sp. Parupeneus porphyreus). The Whitesaddle Goatfish has a special place in Hawaiian culture. In ancient Hawaii, the fish were used in offerings to the gods. Courtesy of Derek Yoshinori Wada hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Derek Yoshinori Wada
Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner's address book, circa 1950-1956 Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner's address book, circa 1950-1956 Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

Tres hermanas- "Three Sisters", Cuajinicuilapa, Guerrero, Mexico, 1986. Tony Gleaton/Courtesy The Tony Gleaton Photographic Trust, All Rights Reserved hide caption

itoggle caption Tony Gleaton/Courtesy The Tony Gleaton Photographic Trust, All Rights Reserved

Gov. Bill Clinton shakes hands with the crowd as he arrives at a rally being held for him in Hartford, Conn., in March 1992. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Cole/AP

A glitched Little Mermaid piece sits in front of a dismal castle as part of the artist Banksy's biggest show to date, titled Dismaland, at Tropicana in Weston-super-Mare, England. Yui Mok/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Yui Mok/PA Photos/Landov

Paul Durand-Ruel, shown above in his gallery in 1910, acquired some 5,000 impressionist works — long before others were buying them. Dornac/Durand-Ruel & Cie/Courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art hide caption

itoggle caption Dornac/Durand-Ruel & Cie/Courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art

Rontherin Ratliff's Things that Float sculpture contains photographs he rescued from his grandmother's drowned house. Courtesy of Rontherin Ratliff hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Rontherin Ratliff

Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring stares back at cellphones at the Frick Collection in New York City. "The art museum used to offer objects, works of art, the finest that we have," Lewis says. "And it's gone from offering objects to offering an experience." Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi, seen here in his New York studio in 1940, exhibited with Georgia O'Keeffe and Edward Hopper. But his work was quickly forgotten after his death in 1953. Alfredo Valente/Alfredo Valente papers/ Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution hide caption

itoggle caption Alfredo Valente/Alfredo Valente papers/ Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

In 16th century Italy, the nobility began decorating their tables with "triumphs" made entirely from folded napkins. The art form had pretty much died out by the time artist Joan Sallas began studying centuries-old illustrations and taught himself how to re-create them. Photo from The Beauty of the Fold: A Conversation With Joan Sallas. Courtesy of Charlotte Birnbaum/Sternberg Press hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Charlotte Birnbaum/Sternberg Press