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Fool Me Once: Colter Stevens (Jake Gyllenhaal), a military helicopter pilot, finds himself plugged into another man's consciousness and sent back in time — to eight minutes before his host is killed in a terrorist attack. Jonathan Wenk/Summit Entertainment hide caption

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Jonathan Wenk/Summit Entertainment

They See Me Rollin': "Robert" is a tire with telekinetic powers — and an increasingly unpleasant way of putting them to work — in Quentin Dupieux's consciously anarchic horror comedy Rubber. Magnet Releasing hide caption

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Magnet Releasing

Cultures, Shocks: A doctor (Mikael Persbrandt) struggles to balance work in a developing-world refugee camp with family strife at home in Denmark, while his estranged wife (Trine Dyrholm) urges him to look after their oft-bullied son. Per Arnesen/Sony Pictures Classic hide caption

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Per Arnesen/Sony Pictures Classic

David Harewood and Lorraine Burroughs star in London's West End production of The Mountaintop, which is expected to open with a new cast on Broadway this fall. Tristram Kenton hide caption

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Tristram Kenton

Broadway To Get A View From MLK's 'Mountaintop'

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Joel Kinnaman and Mireille Enos star in The Killing, a new AMC drama based on a Danish miniseries. Chris Large/AMC hide caption

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Chris Large/AMC

'The Killing': 'Twin Peaks' Meets '24' On AMC

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Tell Me More Launches New Series Of Tweet Poems

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An Iraqi man walks past paintings displayed at a gallery in the Karrada district of central Baghdad on April 13, 2010. Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images

Many Iraqi Artists Struggle, Suffer In Silence

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Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe stands at his 2008 inauguration ceremony at the statehouse in Harare. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi /AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi /AP

A Journalist Bears Witness To Mugabe's Massacre

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Radioactive monster Godzilla stomps through a city and eats a commuter train in a scene from Godzilla, King of the Monsters!, directed by Ishiro Honda and Terry O. Morse. The 1956 film was a re-edited version of the 1954 Japanese film Gojira, directed by Honda. Embassy Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Embassy Pictures/Getty Images

Movie Mutants Give A Face To Our Nuclear Fears

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