In 1975, the Khmer Rouge told the family of Peou Nam that he had been executed. After 36 years of separation, hardship and an unusual series of events, the family was reunited in June this year. Son Phyrun visits his father at his farmhouse in southern Cambodia's Kampot province.

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Dream Sparks Events That Reunite Cambodian Family

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Lujiazui, Shanghai's financial district, includes the world's third- and sixth-tallest buildings. The city's population is 23 million.

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Nations Grow Populations, And Face New Problems

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Newborns lie together at a district women's hospital in Allahabad, in India's most populous state of Uttar Pradesh. Fifty-one babies are born in India every minute.

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When Humans Hit 7 Billion, Will It Happen In India?

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Blind activist Chen Guangcheng with his wife and son outside their home in northeast China's Shandong province in 2005. He's been held incommunicado at his home for more than a year and has become the focus of a microblog campaign by human-rights activists.

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Chinese Activists Turn To Twitter In Rights Cases

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Stone elephants line a newly inaugurated park dedicated to Dalit, or lower caste, leaders in a suburb of New Delhi, India. Mayawati, a politician known as the "Dalit queen," says previous governments did nothing to honor the leaders who fought for Dalit rights.

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In India, Once-Marginalized Now Memorialized

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Residents wade along a flooded street on the outskirts of Bangkok on Thursday. Clambering aboard bamboo rafts and army trucks, residents fled their homes as high waters moved closer to the heart of the city.

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Bangkok At Risk Of Its Worst Flooding In Decades

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At least 80 business owners have abandoned factories like this one in Wenzhou, China's entrepreneurial capital, because they have run up exorbitant debts to the city's loan sharks and underground lenders.

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Boom In Shadow Financing Exacts High Toll In China

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An image from the Twitter-like Chinese site Weibo.com shows a composite image of the toddler's mother, Qu Feifei (left); her rescuer, Chen Xianmei (top right) and Wang Yue.

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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton looks on as Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar speaks at a joint news conference in Islamabad on Friday.

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Clinton Pushes Pakistan On Terrorism

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Zhou Youguang, founder of the Pinyin system of romanizing the Chinese language, has published 10 books since turning 100, some reflecting his critical views of the Chinese government. Shown here in his book-lined study, the outspoken Zhou has witnessed a century of change in China.

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At 105, Chinese Linguist Now A Government Critic

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A street vendor sells her wares by the light of a kerosene wick lamp in Lagos, Nigeria. The country claims ownership of one of the world's great energy reserves, but corruption and mismanagement leave Africa's oil giant chronically short of electricity. Businesses and walled residential compounds run costly diesel generators.

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The 'Informal Economy' Driving World Business

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