Dubai now boasts the world's largest building, Burj Khalifa. Zakaria says the world is now experiencing what he calls "the rise of the rest," where countries around the world are growing at previously unthinkable rates. Marwan Naamani/Getty Images hide caption

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What Does A 'Post-American World' Look Like?

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Journalist On Surviving In Iran: Don't Name Names

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Isolation Proves Dangerous On 'Rat Island'

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A highway links Southern California's Ventura and Hollywood freeways in 1953 — one of the crowning achievements of the "good roads" movement that actually began in the 19th century with bicycles. L. J. Willinger/Getty Images hide caption

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L. J. Willinger/Getty Images

'Big Roads': From Tire-Killing Paths To Superhighways

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How Industrial Farming 'Destroyed' The Tasty Tomato

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Princess Diana died on Aug. 31, 1997, in a Paris car crash while trying to avoid paparazzi. Princess Diana Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Princess Diana Archive/Getty Images

'Untold Story': What If Princess Diana Had Survived?

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Josh Ritter is a singer-songwriter who has released six albums. Bright's Passage is his first novel. Marcelo Biglia/ hide caption

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Marcelo Biglia/

Josh Ritter: First A Songwriter, Now A Novelist

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The green bean salad with snow peas, coriander and mustard seeds and tarragon, from Yotam Ottolenghi's Plenty. Ottolenghi's column, "The New Vegetarian," has run in London's Guardian newspaper since 2006. Jonathan Lovekin hide caption

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Jonathan Lovekin

For London Chef, 'Plenty' To Love About Vegetables

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Golf, track, basketball ... Babe Didrikson Zaharias could do it all. Hulton Archive/Getty hide caption

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Remembering A 'Babe' Sports Fans Shouldn't Forget

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How 'Whitey' Bulger Greased Palms For His Freedom

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BBC Host Becomes A 'Bad Beekeeper'

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In 1897, New York was a town of many newspapers in which the New York World, the New York Journal, the New York Herald, the New York Post and more competed for the public eye. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

How A New York 'Murder' Sparked The Tabloid Wars

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Author Of 'Robopocalypse' On The Future Of Robotics

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A Mixed Race Take On What It Means To Be 'Free'

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A self-portrait by Rembrandt, valued at $36 million, was taken from the Swedish National Museum in 2000. Robert Wittman, founder of the FBI's Art Crime Team, went undercover — as an authenticator for an Eastern European mob group — to recover it. Swedish National Museum hide caption

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Swedish National Museum

Robert Wittman's 'Priceless' Pursuit Of Stolen Art

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