A fan holds a copy of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows at a book release party at Scholastic headquarters in New York in 2007. Clark Jones/AP hide caption

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Harry Potter Inc. Hopes To Re-Create The Magic, Hogwarts And All, With 'Cursed Child'

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Dickinson vividly described flowers and plants in her poetry. Click here to read her poem, "It will be Summer — eventually." Courtesy of the Emily Dickinson Museum hide caption

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Never Mind The White Dress, Turns Out Emily Dickinson Had A Green Thumb

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In 'The Girls,' A Teen's Need To Be Noticed Draws Her Into A Manson-Like Cult

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Lois Duncan was a pioneer in the genre of teen suspense. Books like Down a Dark Hall scared generations of readers. Courtesy of Ig Publishing hide caption

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Remembering Lois Duncan, The Queen Of Teen Suspense

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Physicist Stephon Alexander shares his love of science with his students at Brown University, and his love of jazz with musicians around Providence. Courtesy Ari Daniel hide caption

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Scientist Stephon Alexander: 'Infinite Possibilities' Unite Jazz And Physics

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Perkins and Wolfe lean over the novelist's unwieldy manuscript. Marc Brenner/Roadside Attractions hide caption

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The Editor's Epic: Maxwell Perkins Makes For An Unlikely Big-Screen Hero

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'Curious George' Learns How American-Muslims Celebrate Ramadan

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Exploring The 'Quiet New York' With Emma Straub

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The first issue of Black Panther, written by Ta-Nehisi Coates (with art by Brian Stelfreeze) is the top-selling comic of 2016 so far. Marvel Entertainment hide caption

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Now At Your Comic Shop: Ta-Nehisi Coates And Michael Chabon

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Winner of the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for fiction Han Kang, right, and her translator who shares the prize, Deborah Smith, following the award ceremony in London. They received the award for the novel, The Vegetarian. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Crepes are a cousin of the enchilada, says Mexican chef Pati Jinich. A vestige of French intervention in Mexico, crepes are now considered classics of Mexican gastronomy. (Above) Jinich's crepe enchiladas with corn, poblano chiles and squash in an avocado-tomatillo sauce. Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Empty storefronts line the streets of Northern Cambria, Pa., Jennifer Haigh's hometown. Rob Arnold hide caption

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'Heat & Light' Digs For The Soul Of Coal Country

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Cairo's Tahrir Square (seen here in January) isn't actually a square — it's a traffic circle. And today, years after it was the site of anti-government demonstrations, it's a beautifully manicured, sterile space. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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From Tahrir To Tiananmen, 'City Squares' Can't Escape Their History

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"Manly health!" Whitman wrote in the New York Atlas. "Is there not a kind of charm --€” a fascinating magic in the words?" The poet is seen here in an engraving that appeared in several editions of Leaves of Grass. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Song Of My Self-Help: Follow Walt Whitman's 'Manly Health' Tips (Or Maybe Don't)

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Activist, Professor, Historian — Now A Poetry Pulitzer Prize Winner

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George Plimpton Reissues Books That Took Us Inside The Game

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Chilean writer and poet Pablo Neruda, after being awarded the 1971 Nobel Prize in Literature. STF/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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'The Lost Neruda' Can Now Be Found In 'Then Come Back'

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