Walter Mosley On The Stories Of LA Told Through Easy Rawlins

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3 Books To Take On Your Summer Getaway

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Woman Marries Man Who Got Her Attention With Tweets

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'Ask Polly' Columnist Tells Advice-Seekers 'How To Be A Person In The World'

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'Like Water For Chocolate' Author Is Out With A Crime Thriller

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'The Panama Papers' Book: Inside The Ping Heard 'Round The World

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Suki Kim is the author of Without You, There Is No Us. Ed Kashi/Courtesy of Crown hide caption

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Mislabeled As A Memoirist, Author Asks: Whose Work Gets To Be Journalism?

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Terry McMillan accepts the award for outstanding literary work, fiction, for Getting to Happy at the 42nd NAACP Image Awards in 2011 in Los Angeles. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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Terry McMillan's Latest: Revisiting Past Loves, Rediscovering Yourself

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A fan holds a copy of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows at a book release party at Scholastic headquarters in New York in 2007. Clark Jones/AP hide caption

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Harry Potter Inc. Hopes To Re-Create The Magic, Hogwarts And All, With 'Cursed Child'

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Dickinson vividly described flowers and plants in her poetry. Click here to read her poem, "It will be Summer — eventually." Courtesy of the Emily Dickinson Museum hide caption

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Never Mind The White Dress, Turns Out Emily Dickinson Had A Green Thumb

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In 'The Girls,' A Teen's Need To Be Noticed Draws Her Into A Manson-Like Cult

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Lois Duncan was a pioneer in the genre of teen suspense. Books like Down a Dark Hall scared generations of readers. Courtesy of Ig Publishing hide caption

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Remembering Lois Duncan, The Queen Of Teen Suspense

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Physicist Stephon Alexander shares his love of science with his students at Brown University, and his love of jazz with musicians around Providence. Ari Daniel for NPR hide caption

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Scientist Stephon Alexander: 'Infinite Possibilities' Unite Jazz And Physics

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Perkins and Wolfe lean over the novelist's unwieldy manuscript. Marc Brenner/Roadside Attractions hide caption

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The Editor's Epic: Maxwell Perkins Makes For An Unlikely Big-Screen Hero

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'Curious George' Learns How American-Muslims Celebrate Ramadan

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