Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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Motivated Reasoning: A Philosopher On Confirmation Bias

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A self-portrait taken by Cajal in his library when he was in his 30s. Courtesy Instituto Cajal del Consjo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid hide caption

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Courtesy Instituto Cajal del Consjo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid

Art Exhibition Celebrates Drawings By The Founder Of Modern Neuroscience

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Though Donald Trump's policies may not help his voters economically, sociologist Arlie Hochschild says he is speaking to them on a deeper level: meeting their emotional needs. MICHAEL MATHES/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MICHAEL MATHES/AFP/Getty Images

Isaac Lidsky talks about losing his sight on the TED Stage. Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/TED

How Can Going Blind Give You Vision?

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How Do Pheremones Really Work? Maria Pavlova/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Pavlova/Getty Images

How Do Pheromones Really Work?

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Astronomer Wanda Diaz Merced talks about "sonification" on the TED stage. Marla Aufmuth/TED hide caption

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Marla Aufmuth/TED

How Can We Hear The Stars?

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Kim Kardashian and Donald Trump exemplify our contradictory feelings about the rich and famous. As Hidden Brain explores this week, we idolize the powerful, but also relish their downfall. D Dipasupil/WireImage hide caption

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D Dipasupil/WireImage

Trees can't talk — or can they? Ecologist Suzanne Simard says tree communicate with each other in a unique way. Courtesy Suzanne Simard hide caption

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Courtesy Suzanne Simard

How Do Trees Collaborate?

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Anthropologist Robin Dunbar says our social networks are limited to about 150 connections. Courtesy of Robin Dunbar hide caption

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Courtesy of Robin Dunbar

Is There A Limit To How Many Friends We Can Have?

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Are there ways to make traffic better in our cities? Video still courtesy TED hide caption

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Video still courtesy TED

Can We Improve Our Transportation Network Using...Biology?

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Computer scientist Avi Rubin speaking at TEDxMidAtlantic. Chris Suspect/TED hide caption

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Chris Suspect/TED

What Happens When Hackers Hijack Our Smart Devices?

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A child takes a facial recognition test in which he is asked to match the face on the top to one of the faces on the bottom. Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science hide caption

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Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science

Brain Area That Recognizes Faces Gets Busier And Better In Young Adults

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Researchers from the Max Planck Institute excavate the East Gallery of Denisova Cave in Siberia in August 2010. With ancient bone fragments so hard to come by, being able to successfully filter dirt for the DNA of extinct human ancestors can open new doors, research-wise. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

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Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Dust To Dust: Scientists Find DNA Of Human Ancestors In Cave Floor Dirt

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An artist's rendering of a black hole that's 2 billion times more massive than our sun. Streams of particles ejected from black holes like this one are thought to be the brightest objects in the universe. ESO/M. Kornmesser hide caption

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ESO/M. Kornmesser

Some Bizarre Black Holes Put On Light Shows

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As more people turn to laser displays for holiday house decorations, aviation authorities warn not to shine them into the sky. TeleBrands hide caption

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TeleBrands

For Christmas Thrills Without The Spills, More Decorators Turn To Lasers

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Why Does A Frozen Lake Sound Like A Star Wars Blaster?

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NPR Staff: We Pry Into The 'Why' Behind Our Own Anxiety Dreams

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