The supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Smithsonian Institute/via Flickr hide caption

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A Physicist Explains Why Parallel Universes May Exist

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Listen To Prairie Dogs Talk

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This is what researchers at the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider expect data from a Higgs boson to look like. The Higgs boson is the subatomic particle that scientists say gives everything in the universe mass. ATLAS Experiment/CERN hide caption

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Particle Pings: Sounds Of The Large Hadron Collider

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