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Why Leaves Really Fall Off Trees
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A Head-Shrinker Studies The Zombie Brain
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Artist concept of the Ares I-X rocket. Courtesy of NASA hide caption

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NASA To Launch World's Tallest Rocket
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In this illustration, new viruses emerge from an infected human throat cell. When you get the flu, viruses turn your cells into tiny virus factories that help spread the disease. Courtesy XVIVO/Zirus hide caption

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This retinal prosthesis has been implanted in the eyes of 32 patients. The device receives wireless data from the camera which it then translates into electronic signals that are sent to the brain, restoring sight. Courtesy Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. hide caption

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Bionic Eye Opens New World Of Sight For Blind
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The study tested classically trained violinists and pianists, and found that their brains were much better adapted to discern subtle pitch and tonal differences in sound. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Say What?! Musicians Hear Better
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A snowy tree cricket feeds on a leaf from a mountain dalea plant. Gerardine Vargas hide caption

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Slo-Mo Cricket Chirps Reveal Secret Serenades
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A Bird In Hand To Save Those In The Bush
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Making Memories With Fruit Flies
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Every time you crack open a soda, your taste buds may help you get the full experience of the carbonated beverage. Arthur Carlo Franco/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Study: When Soda Fizzes, Your Tongue Tastes It
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A sexton beetle buries a recently deceased shrew. Image courtesy of Fabricator of Useless Articles hide caption

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To Casket Or Not To Casket?
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Move Over, Lucy; Ardi May Be Oldest Human Ancestor
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An aggressive encounter between two male greater prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido). During aggressive encounters, males leap into the air and strike their opponent with feet, wings and/or beak. Fort Pierre National Grassland, South Dakota. Gerrit Vyn/gerritvynphoto.com hide caption

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Grunts And Gurgles Signal Love For Grouse
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