Courtesy of Jeremy Wilmer

Can't Remember Faces? Blame Your Genes

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An artist's rendering of the 70-million-year-old fish Bonnerichthys. This large bony fish got its dinner much like today's whales, by slurping in water and filtering out tiny sea creatures. Image courtesy of Robert Nicholls, www.paleocreations.com hide caption

toggle caption Image courtesy of Robert Nicholls, www.paleocreations.com

Prehistoric Megafish Ate Ocean's Tiniest Critters

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Neil Wagner

Listen To Bee Humiliate Humans

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The golden mask of Tutankhamen is displayed at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. New research suggests that the famous pharaoh suffered from numerous ailments, and probably spent much of his life in pain before dying at 19 from the combined effects of malaria and a broken leg. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

toggle caption Amr Nabil/AP

Frail And Sickly, King Tut Suffered Through Life

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Melanie Stetson Freeman/Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

Hear Why Barb Smut's Glasses Got All Steamy

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Studying Leaves With Physics And Fluorescent Dye

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Taken in 1990 by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft, the "pale blue dot" photo shows what our planet looks like from 4 billion miles away. Earth is the tiny speck of light indicated by the arrow and enlarged in the upper left-hand corner. The pale streak over Earth is an artifact of sunlight scattering in the camera's optics. NASA/JPL hide caption

toggle caption NASA/JPL

An Alien View Of Earth

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The 12-inch gold-plated records contain greetings in 59 languages, samples of music from different cultures and eras, and natural and human-made sounds from Earth. One record is currently 16.89 billion km from Earth, the other is over 13 billion km away. NASA Center: Jet Propulsion Laboratory hide caption

toggle caption NASA Center: Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Carl Sagan And Ann Druyan's Ultimate Mix Tape

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Math Professor Helps Uncover Art Fakes

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Guns, Tumors And The Limits Of The Human Eye

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Maggie Starbard for NPR

Listen Here Before It's Too Late

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Coronal loops, seen here, are fountains of multimillion-degree gas in the atmosphere of the sun. They are often precursors to solar flares, which emit strong bursts of electromagnetic energy. NASA/AP hide caption

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Storms In Space Disrupt Travel On Earth

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The bdelloid rotifer Philodina gregaria. Bdelloid rotifers are tiny invertebrates that reproduce asexually. Courtesy of Micrographia hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Micrographia

Listen To Segment: A Long Dry Spell

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An artist's rendition of two Sinosauropteryx dinosaurs, showing their short, bristle-like feathers along the midline of the head, neck, back and around the tail, forming irregular stripes. Chuang Zhao and Lida Xing hide caption

toggle caption Chuang Zhao and Lida Xing

Listen Discovering Dinosaur Color From Fossilized Feathers

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iStockphoto.com

Listen to Cake Topple Your Brain

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