Magritte's 1964 painting The Intimate Newspaper gets us thinking: Who is this? A familiar friend or a complete stranger? Rene Magritte/Corbis hide caption

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Seeing Impostors: When Loved Ones Suddenly Aren't

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Not Too Late To Tap Into 'Genius In All Of Us'

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When this poster was printed in 1900, mind reading was still in the realm of magic. A new computer program capable of predicting individuals recollections has brought telepathy a small step closer to science. Library of Congress hide caption

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Computers One Step Closer To Reading Your Mind

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A genetic abnormality causes this chicken to exhibit both male and female characteristics. The right (white) side is typical of males and the left (brown) side is typical of females. The Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh hide caption

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Half-Rooster/Half-Hen Helps Unlock Sex Mystery

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Chameleons, such as this Chamaeleo calyptratus, feed by way of ballistic tongue projection, which launches their tongues at prey with a rapid burst of speed. Cold temperatures do not slow their tongues down, allowing chameleons to catch meals even when the temperature drops. Courtesy of Christopher V. Anderson hide caption

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William and Laura Betts live on Dana Lane in the community of Moreno Valley, Calif. The couple stand out because they actually paid off their mortgage in 2005. William, who lost his job in November 2009, is glad they don't have to worry about making payments on their house. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Walking One Block Damaged By The Housing Crisis

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Rock Out With A Homemade Electric Guitar

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Oddball Amoebas Sprout Arms When Stressed

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As temperatures drop during the winter months, female mosquitoes like Culex pipiens gain weight to conserve energy. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Like Bears, Mosquitoes Fatten Up For Winter

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A life-sized reconstruction of the moment just before the dinosaur hatching and snake were preserved. The scales and patterning of the snake's skin is based on its modern relatives. The coloration of the hatchling is the artist's interpretation. Sculpture by Tyler Keillor/Photo by Ximena Erickson/Image modified by Bonnie Miljour hide caption

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In Fossil Find, 'Anaconda' Meets 'Jurassic Park'

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Courtesy of Jeremy Wilmer

Can't Remember Faces? Blame Your Genes

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An artist's rendering of the 70-million-year-old fish Bonnerichthys. This large bony fish got its dinner much like today's whales, by slurping in water and filtering out tiny sea creatures. Image courtesy of Robert Nicholls, www.paleocreations.com hide caption

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Prehistoric Megafish Ate Ocean's Tiniest Critters

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Neil Wagner

Listen To Bee Humiliate Humans

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The golden mask of Tutankhamen is displayed at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. New research suggests that the famous pharaoh suffered from numerous ailments, and probably spent much of his life in pain before dying at 19 from the combined effects of malaria and a broken leg. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Frail And Sickly, King Tut Suffered Through Life

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Melanie Stetson Freeman/Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

Hear Why Barb Smut's Glasses Got All Steamy

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