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Justice Antonin Scalia on NPR

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Scalia Talks to NPR

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Scalia Talks to NPR

Justice Antonin Scalia on NPR

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U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia speaks at Roger Williams University Law School in Bristol, R.I., on April 7.


Stephan Savoia/AP

In the first of a planned three-part interview with NPR's, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia talks about his more than a quarter century on the nation's top bench.

Totenberg reports that Scalia has carried the conservative banner and often been in the minority. "Though he has failed to persuade a majority of his colleagues on many high-profile cases, supporters and critics alike agree that he has changed the terms of the debate," she writes.

She argues that Scalia and fellow conservative Clarence Thomas do not actually march in lockstep — despite what liberal observers might say. For one thing, Scalia is far more reluctant to undo an old law.

"I'm an originalist and a textualist, not a nut," he tells her.

And no, he's not a likely running mate for John McCain.

Check it out: Justice Scalia, the Great Dissenter, Opens Up